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Developing Solutions for Microsoft Azure

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Developing Solutions for Microsoft Azure

Includes 323 Questions & Answers

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Exam Title Files
Exam
AZ-204
Title
Developing Solutions for Microsoft Azure
Files
11

Microsoft Certified: Azure Developer Associate Certification Exam Dumps & Practice Test Questions

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22. AZ-203/204 - Understanding on how we deployed the docker container

Hi and welcome back. Now in this chapter, before going ahead and Dockerizing a dotnet core application, I first want to go ahead and show you how you can deploy a dotnet core application on a Linux virtual machine. So for the purpose of this demo, I have an existing Linux virtual machine. On this, I've already gone ahead and installed Docker. Now on this particular virtual machine, we are going to install the ASP.NET CO SDK version three. We are then going to go ahead and publish our application locally from Visual Studio. So I have a Net Core application in place. So in order to copy our application onto the server, we first have to go ahead and publish our application. We will then go ahead and copy the published folder onto the server, and then we'll run our application using Net. Now, by default, the configuration that is in place means that when you go ahead and run an application, like an Anet Core application, it will run on a Castroweb server on this particular port number that's locally. Now in order to get better features for running a web application, this Castle web server does not have all the features of a web server, so you can go ahead and use another web server known as NGINX or even Apache, and that is what we're going to do in this particular lab. So we're going to see how we can actually reach our Net Core web application that's running on the Castroweb server via an Engine X web server. So on the same virtual machine, we're going to go ahead and install the NGINX web server, and we're going to behave as a reverse proxy. So when a user makes a request onto the home page for NGINX, they will actually be directed onto our net code application. Now, for some of the steps that we must take, we must first ensure that the add code to forward header information is present in our code, and we must also modify the NGINX configuration file so that NGEx knows that when a request comes from a user, it must be routed to our ASP.NET Core application. So let's go ahead and perform these lists of steps. Now, please note, I am referring to the documentation that is available, so there's documentation available on how you can run your Net Core applications on a Linux machine on NGINX and even Apache. So I'm using this as a reference. So firstly, I have on my local system a Net Core application. What you have to do is go on to the startup file, and you have to ensure that you add the right middleware for forwarding headers. So you have to add this in your configure section in the startup file. So, now that we have this in place, I've opened the folder that contains my project in the command prompt. Now let me go ahead and publish my particular project. So I'll publish to dot-net. So this will detect my project file, and it will publish my application. We can then copy this application onto our server, right? So it actually goes ahead. It creates a publish folder in bin debug netco app 3.1, and we have the publish folder. So here I am in Azure. Now I have a Linux virtual machine in place. So this Linux virtual machine only has Docker installed. Now, on this machine, first let me go ahead and also install InGenX. So I'll do a pseudo-app update first. Then I'll install Intenex. So this is a Web server that's available on the Linux platform. Now, I've ensured that I have my network security groups in place to allow traffic on port 80. So let me clear the screen. So if I go on to the networking section, when I went ahead and created my Linux virtual machine, I had port 80 open over here. So if I go on to the overview, let me take the public IP address. Let me go on to a new tab. So you can see the home page for NGINX. But what we want to do is that you want to ensure that when we go on the homepage for the Internet, we get our ASP.NET Core application. So first on the server, I'm going to go ahead and install the SDK for 3.1. So this is all available in the Microsoft documentation as well. What are the lists of commands to execute? Finally, go ahead and install the DotNet SDK. Now, once this is completed, please allow me to connect from Windows SAP to our new server. So I'll go and take the public IP address of this Linux virtual machine. So I'm in the home Linux user folder by default. Now, on the left-hand side, I browse for the folder where I have my project. So let me go on to the bin folder, debug 3.1. Here is my published folder. Let me go ahead and copy it onto the server. So I can just do a simple drag and drop onto the server. Now, once the folder is copied, if I go back onto the server, let me hit Clear. Let me go on to the published folder. So over here I have my Coproject DL file over here.So this is what we want to run. So let's go ahead and do a net-project DL. So we are now running our application on the CastleWeb server that's listening over here on port 5000. Now, let me go ahead and duplicate this session because you have to now configure NGINX to forward all the requests onto this Kestal web server. So, once this is completed, please allow me to return to Win SAP. Now I have to go on to the configuration for NGINX. So I have to go on to the etc. folder. I have to search for Engine X over here, I have to go on to the sites available, and I have to go ahead and modify this file. Now, before I go ahead and modify this file over here, I have to go ahead and give permission to modify this file. So let me hit Clear, and then proceed to etc. NGINX sites are available. I just give permissions, so the name of the file is set to default. Once that is done, let me go ahead and hit Refresh. Let me go on to the file. Open it. So I'm going to add some configurations also given in the Microsoft documentation. So I'm adding the following information. So this allows our Engine X Web Server to forward our requests onto the Keshe Web Server, which is hosting our Net Core application. So this ensures that the lines of location are kept as they are shown over here, and you can go ahead and click on Save. Now, even if you get an error, "permission denied," it's fine; this file will be saved. I'll go ahead and click on Skip. So if you can only confirm, you can go ahead and open the file again on the server. and here you can see the information. Now we just need to make sure that the NGINX web server is loaded on the Linux machine and that it is configured properly. So that is also done. So now if I go on to the home page for NGINX, you can now see our demo application. But there is just a problem when it comes to the bootstrap or the JavaScript when it comes to the user interface for the application. So if you want to go ahead and resolve this particular issue, what you have to do is go on to the published folder for dubdup root. Go on to that. Let's go on to the folder on the server. So all of the content data for NGINX is basically stored in slash war in slash dub dub dub. So this is the root for NGINX. You can go ahead and copy the CSS files, the GS files, and the library files onto the server over here. It's in "permission denied." So let's ensure we give the right permissions first. So again, I'll go on to the Ryanx VM. I'm going to war dot dub dub. I'll show you how to get permissions on the HTML folder. Once that is done, I'll click refresh over here. Let me go ahead and try to copy it again. And now it's copying all of our files. Let's come back once a copy is complete. Once a copy is complete, if you go back to the home page, you can now see your application is loading properly. And if you exercise your application, you can see it works as expected, right? So this marks the end of this chapter, wherein I've shown you how you can deploy a NetCore application onto a Linux VM virtual machine.

23. AZ-203/204 - Lab - Deploying a .Net core application onto a Linux VM

Hi and welcome back. In this chapter, we will learn how to Dockerize our Net Core application and deploy it to a Linux VM that already has Docker installed. So, what were the general steps in our pride chapter when we deployed our Net Core application onto a Linux VM? Well, first we installed the ASPnet Core SDK version 3. We then copied our published application onto the server, and then we first went out and ran the application using the net come on line.We then obviously configured NGINX to route the requests onto the gestural and web servers that were hosting our net application. Now let's say you want to package this inside an image and then as a container, so you can actually go ahead and create your own custom images in Docker. So the Docker tool set allows you to create something known as a Docker file. The docker file is nothing more than a set of instructions for creating a custom image. So when you have this custom image in place, which will go ahead and perform all of these steps, you can then go ahead and deploy the images onto multiple virtual machines that have Docker installed. So now remember, instead of actually going ahead, performing all of these steps, and deploying your application on a Linux virtual machine, you just want to go ahead and run a container based on an image using the Docker tool set. So for that, we are going to be making use of a Docker file. So what are the contents of the Docker file? So the first statement is used to specify what should be the base image for creating this custom image. So remember, the first step was to go ahead and install the NET SDK. So that is the first step. Over here, we specify that please use the image available on Docker Hub for at least the base installation in place of the netcosdk, and then we can specify something known as a working directory. Now remember, your container is like an isolated unit. That container; remember last time around, Weran Ingen X had a container? So the container, the isolated system, contains its own file system. It also contains its own virtual network interface. So it's kind of a complete package solution that works on Docker's runtime. So remember, this file system is different from the file system on the actual machine or the host the Docker container runs on. So our Linux virtual machine will have its own network interface and its own file system, whereas the container has everything embedded inside of it. So that's why, in that particular file system in the container, we have the ability to create or specify something known as a working directory. So over here we're saying that slashapp will be our working directory. We are then going to go ahead and copy the contents of our published directory directly onto this working directory. We are then going to go ahead and expose Port 5000. So by default, the image that is available in this Net Core actually exposes port 80. We have to set the environment variable to ensure that we expose Port 5000 and also expose it in the container. The entry point can be used to specify what should run when the container starts up. So we're saying please run the net CLI, which will be available as part of this image, and please run our DLL, which will be available after we copy the contents of our working directory, right? So these are the general lists of steps. Now let's see how we can implement this. Right, so now, remember, in our earlier chapter, we had two windows open onto our Linux VM virtual machine. One was running a Net Core application. So over here, I'm going to hit CTRL C to go ahead and shut down this application because now we're going to run it as a Docker container. Now I'm going to leave the other window open. So we still have NGINX running this. NGINX will still route the request from our users onto our Net Core application. But this time, remember, our Net Core application will be running in a container. So this is the Docker file I mentioned. So first, we have the base image from which we are going to install our Net Core SDK. by specifying our working directory. We are going to copy the contents, and I'll explain this to you in a bit. We're exposing the environment URL, the port number, and the entry point. Now in Minnesota, I am in the published folder. So in the home Linux user's published folder, remember, we copied the published folder from our local workstation onto the server. Now, on the same published folder, I've actually gone ahead and pushed the Docker file from my local system onto this remote published folder. So, this folder also has mycoproject DRL. It has all of my files. So if you go back onto a copy statement, what we're saying is that wherever the Docker file is located, please copy the contents from the current directory. So that's all the files on my current working directory, which is slash app.That's the meaning of this particular statement. Now that we have this Docker file in that particular location, we are now going to execute a set of commands. So these are the commands we are going to execute. So first, go ahead and use the Docker build command to create a custom image. And then we're going to go ahead and run that particular Docker image. So here I am in one of my sessions in the published folder. Let me go ahead and just clear the screen. So first, let me do a pseudo Docker build. So over here, it's first going out and performing the first step, which you can see over here—that is, to go ahead and pull the image from Docker Hub, which is Arco SDK. Once the image has been placed, the second step of creating the working directory has begun. It's also gone ahead and performed all the other steps of copying all the contents, setting the environment variable, and exposing the port. So let me go ahead and just clear the screen. So if I do a pseudo Docker image, I'll be able to see all the images I have on my local system. So I have my Net SDK image and now my custom image, which is NetApp. So now I'm going to use the docker run command to execute. This has a detached process. Over here again, I'm mapping the port number 5000 of the container onto port 5000 of the Linux virtual machine. Remember, our index is going to then lock requests similar to what you've done before, and we are specifying what image to now use. That's our net app image. So I'll go ahead and run this command. Now, if you do a pseudo Docker PS, you can see all the containers that are running. So, we have one container in place that is listing on Port 5000 over here. So now if I just go ahead and refresh the page There is a public IP address on our Linux virtual machine. So it's still working as desired. But keep in mind that our request from NGINX is now being routed to our ESP Net core application, which is hosted in a container. If you go on to DDS, everything works as expected. But keep in mind that you are not currently running the Net Core application over here. It's running within a container. Now, at any point in time, if you want to go ahead and stop the container from running, you can do a pseudo Docker stop. And over here we have the container ID. You can use the first two or the first three identifiers of the container ID to stop the container itself. So I'll just type in EB. So to stop the container So now if you try to see the containers, you don't have any containers running. So just to verify this, if you now try to refresh this page, you will get a bad gateway request, and that's because our application is not running within the container, right? So this marks the end of this chapter, wherein we looked at how to Dockerize a Dotted Application and how to make it work.

24. AZ-203/204 - Lab - Containerizing a .Net app

Hi and welcome back. In an earlier chapter, we saw how we could dockerize a dotnet called Application using something known as a docker file. Using the Docker file, we created a custom image and were able to create a container out of that image. Now let's say you have other virtual machines on which you want to go ahead and run this image as a container. Now, this image is currently on a Linux virtual machine. So in order to run it on other Linux virtual machines, if you want to run the image as a container, you might have to go ahead and copy the images on to each of the virtual machines. Now, in order to enable an automatic download of the image when you issue the Docker run command, one option is to go ahead and upload the image onto Docker Hub. So you can go ahead and have your own repositories. It will be a public repository, and you can upload your images onto Docker Hub. Or the other option is to go ahead and have a private registry in Azure that's known as the Azure Container Registry. So from this Linux virtual machine, you can use Azure CLI commands to push that image onto an Azure Container Registry. And then on additional Linux Virtual Machines, you can actually download the image and run it as a container, which makes more sense. So let's see how we can implement this scenario. So here we are in Azure. Now the first thing we're going to do is to add a new resource. So we're going to add a new container history. I'll hit on create.I'll choose my subscription and my resource group. I'll give it a restrained name. It should be unique. So it will be appended to the Azure CD IO. I'll go with MyRegion in the central United States. I'll enable the admin user because this will be required for our next exercise. When we look at your container instances, I'll leave this queue as it is. I won't add any encryption. I'll go on Review and Create, and I'm going to go ahead and create this container registry. Now, while our container tree is being spun up, we are going to go ahead and install the Azure command line interface. This will be required to log into our container registry, and then we can use the surrounder command to basically push our custom image onto this registry. So these are all commands available in the Microsoft documentation. So let me go ahead and execute these commands. So updating the package index Next, I'll go ahead and install the Azure CLI. Once this is done, let me just go ahead and clear the screen. So now I'm going to log in to my Azure account. So it allows me to go on to a URL and then enter the code for authentication. So I'll go on to the URL. I'll enter that code. So I'm going to enter it manually. Once I enter the code, I'll click on "Next." It will then ask me to pick an account. So I'll pick my admin account, and now it will tell me I have signed in to the Azure command line interface. So I logged in. Now let me go ahead and clear the screen again. I can see that I have my container stream set up. So if I go on to the repositories currently, I can see you have no repositories in place. So this is the name of my registry. Let me just go ahead and replace it over here. I'll replace it in all the places I have in my commands. So now I'm going to go ahead and log into my container history. Now, once that is done, we have to go ahead and tag our custom image. So remember, we have our Net App custom image with the name of the registry. So let's go ahead and do that. Once that is done, we can now go ahead and use the docker push command to push our image onto the container registry. Once the push is complete, if you go ahead and refresh, you can now see you have your custom image in place. So you can now drag this image from the AzureContainer history onto other watchmen, right? So this marks the end of this chapter, wherein we have looked at how we can publish our custom images onto an Azure Container Registry.

25. AZ-203/204 - Lab - Azure Container Registry

Hi and welcome back. Now in this chapter we are goingto look at Azure Container instances. So this is a service that allows you to deploy containers in isolation. Here you don't need to manage the underlying infrastructure, and you will understand and actually implement Azure Container instances. You can also persist the data using Azure File Shares, and the container gets an IP address and a fully qualified domain name. So let's go ahead onto Azure. Let's see how we can implement Azure Container Instances. So here I am in Azure. Now, in all resources, let me go ahead and add a new resource. So I'm going to search for container instances. So let me go ahead and choose that. I'll hit on create.So I'll choose my subscription and my resource group. I'll select the Central United States as my location. I'll give a container name. now has the image source. I can choose it as a Quick Start image. Those images are available over here. You can see I also have the ability to pick up an image from the Azure Container Registry. Or I can also go ahead and pick up an image from Docker Hub. So, since we already have an image that we published in our prior chapter onto a container SD, you can go ahead and choose that as your container SD. You can choose the SD name, the image name, and the image tag. The OS type is Linux. You can change the size of the container that is allocated on to your container.In networking, I'm going to ensure that I expose port 50. So remember, our container listens on Port 5000 I'll move on to the advanced: leave everything alone. Let me go on to review and create, and let me go ahead and create this container instance. Now, once you have the Azure Container instance in place, I'll go ahead and add the resource. So over here, you can see that you get a public IP address. So I'll take the public IP address, open a new tab, and navigate to port 5000. So here you can see the homepage for our Net Core application. So over here, what you noticed is that you don't have to spin up a virtual machine. You don't have to install Docker on time. You can just go ahead and specify the location of your image. This service will provision the underlying computer. It will download the image and run it as a container. So if you want to quickly test images to see how they work as containers, you can go ahead and use the Azure Container Instance Service. Right, so this marks of this chapter.

26. AZ-204 - Lab - Azure Container Instances

Hi and welcome back. Now in this chapter, we are going to look at Azure Container Instances. So this is a service that allows you to deploy containers in isolation. Here you don't need to manage the underlying infrastructure, and you will understand and actually implement Azure Container instances. You can also persist the data using Azure File Shares, and the container gets an IP address and a fully qualified domain name. So let's go ahead onto Azure. Let's see how we can implement Azure Container Instances. So here I am in Azure. Now, in all resources, let me go ahead and add a new resource. So I'm going to search for container instances. So let me go ahead and choose that. I'll hit on create.So I'll choose my subscription and my resource group. I'll select the Central United States as my location. I'll give it a container name. now has the image source. I can choose it as a Quick Start image. Those images are available over here. You can see I also have the ability to pick up an image from the Azure Container Registry. Or I can also go ahead and pick up an image from Docker Hub. So, since we already have an image that we published in our prior chapter onto a container SD, you can go ahead and choose that as your container SD. You can choose the SD name, the image name, and the image tag. The OS type is Linux. You can change the size of the container that is allocated on to your container.In the networking I'm going toensure that I expose port 50. So remember, our container listens on Port 5000 I'll move on to the advanced: leave everything alone. Let me go on to review and create, and let me go ahead and create this container instance. Now, once you have the Azure Container instance in place, I'll go ahead and add the resource. So over here, you can see that you get a public IP address. So I'll take the public IP address, open a new tab, and navigate to port 5000. So here you can see the homepage for our Net Core application. So over here, what you noticed is that youdon't have to spin up a virtual machine. You don't have to install Docker on time. You can just go ahead and specify the location of your image. This service will provision the underlying computer. It will download the image and run it as a container. So if you want to quickly test images to see how they work as containers, you can go ahead and use the Azure Container Instance Service. Right, so this marks of this chapter.

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