• Home
  • VMware
  • 2V0-21.20 Professional VMware vSphere 7.x Dumps

Pass Your VMware 2V0-21.20 Exam Easy!

100% Real VMware 2V0-21.20 Exam Questions & Answers, Accurate & Verified By IT Experts

Instant Download, Free Fast Updates, 99.6% Pass Rate

2V0-21.20 Premium Bundle

$79.99

VMware 2V0-21.20 Premium Bundle

2V0-21.20 Premium File: 109 Questions & Answers

Last Update: Jan 06, 2023

2V0-21.20 Training Course: 100 Video Lectures

2V0-21.20 PDF Study Guide: 1129 Pages

2V0-21.20 Bundle gives you unlimited access to "2V0-21.20" files. However, this does not replace the need for a .vce exam simulator. To download VCE exam simulator click here
VMware 2V0-21.20 Premium Bundle
VMware 2V0-21.20 Premium Bundle

2V0-21.20 Premium File: 109 Questions & Answers

Last Update: Jan 06, 2023

2V0-21.20 Training Course: 100 Video Lectures

2V0-21.20 PDF Study Guide: 1129 Pages

$79.99

2V0-21.20 Bundle gives you unlimited access to "2V0-21.20" files. However, this does not replace the need for a .vce exam simulator. To download your .vce exam simulator click here

VMware 2V0-21.20 Exam Screenshots

VMware 2V0-21.20 Practice Test Questions in VCE Format

File Votes Size Date
File
VMware.selftesttraining.2V0-21.20.v2022-11-20.by.julian.62q.vce
Votes
2
Size
713.1 KB
Date
Nov 20, 2022
File
VMware.test-king.2V0-21.20.v2021-11-10.by.luke.53q.vce
Votes
2
Size
264.47 KB
Date
Nov 10, 2021
File
VMware.examlabs.2V0-21.20.v2021-04-04.by.aiden.65q.vce
Votes
1
Size
633.67 KB
Date
Apr 06, 2021
File
VMware.test-king.2V0-21.20.v2020-10-12.by.liyong.35q.vce
Votes
3
Size
676.42 KB
Date
Oct 12, 2020

VMware 2V0-21.20 Practice Test Questions, Exam Dumps

VMware 2V0-21.20 Professional VMware vSphere 7.x exam dumps vce, practice test questions, study guide & video training course to study and pass quickly and easily. VMware 2V0-21.20 Professional VMware vSphere 7.x exam dumps & practice test questions and answers. You need avanset vce exam simulator in order to study the VMware 2V0-21.20 certification exam dumps & VMware 2V0-21.20 practice test questions in vce format.

Managing Networking in vSphere 7

11. Demo: Migrate VMs to a vSphere 7 Distributed Switch

I've already created a VSphere distributed switch. I called it Rick Creshey's demo. I've got a couple of ESXi hosts connected to that VSphere Distributed Switch. Now there are a few different ways that I can go about migrating VMs to that VSphere Distributed Switch. So let's assume that I've got virtual machines running on these two ESXi hosts, and I've just created this Vsphere Distributed Switch. Those VMs are probably connected to some other virtual switch. So if I want to now disconnect them from that other virtual switch and connect them to this virtual switch, what I can do is right click my port group and migrate VMs to another network. So I chose my distributed port group here, and now I can choose my source and destination network. So look at what it's doing. It's forcing me to choose the Source Network as my demo PG. This isn't really going to work for me if I'm trying to get VMs to this distributed port group. Let's dig a little bit deeper here and take a look at some of the VMs on ESXi 3 and ESX 5. Okay, so on ESX three, I have one virtual machine called Weathervane One A. and you can see it's already connected to my distributed port group. So I don't need to migrate that one. On ESX 50 A, I've got a virtual machine called Challenge Five A, and we can see that the network adapter is connected to a different V-spare distributed Distributed Switch.It's connected to a portgroup called Vmregiona One Vds.com. So let's go back to our networking view. We'll right-click this port group, and we'll migrate virtual machines away from that port group to our new distributed port group. So here's the port group that the virtual machine is currently connected to. And by the way, you can tell this by clicking on the port group and just looking at VMs. So I'm going to right-click this port group. I'm going to choose to migrate VMs to another network. The destination network is going to be the distributed port group that I've created. I'll go ahead and hit Okay here, and then I'll hit Next. So what I'm doing is disconnecting VMs from this port group. I'm connecting them to this port group, and now it's going to show me virtual machines that I can potentially migrate to here. And you'll notice that most of these virtual machines are in italics, and they're kind of greyed out. As a matter of fact, there's only one virtual machine that is not in italics and that is not greyed out. And as you can see here, this is the only virtual machine that is accessible. So the destination port group that I've created is only available on hosts ESX three and ESX five. These other VMs are running on ESXi hosts that do not have access to this distributed port group. So I'm going to choose only this virtual machine right here, and I can click on this little carrot here to expand it. And if this virtual machine were to have multiple virtual knicks, I could see them all listed here and pick and choose which ones. It's only on one virtual neck. So I'll go ahead and select that adapter. I'll hit next, and I'll hit finish. So as you can see, this is an easy way. If I had a whole lot of virtual machines that I wanted to migrate from one virtual switch to another, I could do it in a very efficient way by migrating batches of VMs simultaneously. Now, what you want to bear in mind as you do this is that this is the virtual equivalent to going to a computer and unplugging the network cable from one switch and then plugging that network cable into another switch. So don't expect it to have a 100% zero impact. You're disconnecting a VM from one network and reconnecting it to another. So there's going to be a moment where that VM is not connected to the network. So if you have virtual machines that are very sensitive to even very short network disruptions, you want to bear that in mind as you migrate them to a different port group. The other way that we can migrate VMs is to do them one at a time. So I could just simply right-click a virtual machine and go to edit settings. And on that virtual machine, I can pick whatever adapter I want here. So here's network adapter one. I can connect it to a different port group if I see fit, so I can do it one virtual machine at a time. But the method that I showed you before—that's a way. If I have a lot of virtual machines that I want to move at once, that's a fast and easy way to do that, to do a mass migration of many virtual machines to a different port group.

12. Demo: Verify Network Configuration in vSphere 7

You can see I'm logged into my Vs. FAIR client, and I'm at the home screen of the Vsphere client. And so I'm going to start by browsing to Host and Clusters and choosing one of the EsXi hosts here in my lab environment. And then I'm going to go and click on the Configure tab. And under Networking here, there's a bunch of options that we can take a look at. So let me collapse these other areas real quick, and let's just focus on the networking section. And so if we click on virtual switches, this is going to display for us all of the virtual switches that are configured on this particular ESXi host. So I can see I have a Vis for a standardswitch here that is configured on this ESXi host. And remember, a Visa standard switch is local to one specific ESXi host. So I've got a Visa for a standard switch on this host. This host is also participating in a VSphere distributed switch. So we have created a Vsphere distributed switch in the networking area of our Visa client and that Visa distributed switch. We've specified the host that should be participating in that Visa Distributed Switch, and so this host is one of them. So we've got two virtual switches on this host. One is a standard switch, and one is a Vsphere distributed switch. And so let's focus in on the Vsphere Distributed Switch for a moment. And you can see we've got a nice little diagram here showing us the uplinks that are associated with this V-Sphere Distributed Switch. And if I make configuration changes to this VSphere Distributed Switch, those will be reflected here. Also, if I take virtual machines like, for example, the database VM, let's edit the settings on this VM and connect it to the distributed port group that's associated with that VSphere distributed switch. And then let's take a look at how my diagram changes. So let's go back to this host. And now we can see the diagram has been updated. So I've got a virtual machine on this host that is now participating in this Rick Crushi demo PG port group. And I can see which physical adapters are going to be used. If this virtual machine needs to send traffic that's going to hit the physical network, maybe it's destined for a VM on another host or physical server or the Internet. This is the uplink, the VM nic that's going to be used for this particular portgroup on this particular ESXi host. Now all of a sudden my diagram appears to have changed. That's because I have fully automated DRS enabled on this cluster. So I'm just going to turn that off. But just bear in mind that if you're using DRS, it might migrate VMs from host to host. And so that's what happened with my database VM. So I'm just going to quickly move it back here, and I'll just leave this in the course because, hey, it's never a bad idea to kind of talk about DRS a little bit. So there we go. Now my VM is back on host 14 here, and let's take a look at what else we can see here. So we're focused in at the host level and Visa for Distributed Switch is not configured at the host level; these are Vsphere standard switches. So here I've got my Vsphere Standard Switch, and I can edit settings on that Vsphere Standard Switch and make modifications here on my Vsphere Distributed Switch; I don't have that same option on an individual ESXi host. I can view the settings of this Vsphere Distributed Switch, so I can view how it's configured here. And the first setting that's important to note here is, Hey, here's the version of the V Sphere Distributed Switch. It's version seven. I can also see here that my MTU is configured for 1500 bites. So essentially, what the MTU means is: how big can my frames be? And if I need to enable jumbo frames, I'll have to configure that under the networking section. So this is a good way to verify that. Now, if I've configured my virtual machines, for example, if I've configured the operating system of my database VM for a higher MTU than 1500 bytes, that's going to be problematic for me here. So what you want to strive to do is have consistent MTU settings on the operating system of your virtual machine, on the virtual switch, and in the physical network hardware as well. Here we can see that the link layer discovery protocol has been enabled on this particular Vsphere Distributed Switch and that the operation is configured as both. Now I could configure Link Layer Discovery Protocol or Cisco Discovery Protocol, and we can see these here. Under the settings of the Vsphere DistributedSwitch, I have configured the link layer discovery protocol, but it could also be CDP. And basically, this is a way for the virtual switch to learn information about the physical network, and it's also a way to advertise information to the physical network as well. So for example, if I have a physical adapter on one of my ESXi hosts, that adapter can be used as a VM neck or as an uplink for one of my virtual switches. So for example, back here in Hosts and Clusters, I can look at this host and I can see, "Hey, we've got a Vmnic one right here." Well, using Cisco Discovery Protocol or Link Layer Discovery Protocol, I could come in here and see information about the switch that this particular adapter is connected to, including the port number, the physical switch port that it's connected to, and the software version of the physical switch that it's connected to as well. So this is a great way for me to discover information about the physical network and make that information visible inside of the Vsphere client. Now, just one word of caution. Make sure you have a solid understanding of your organization's security policy and whether or not discovery protocols like LDP or CDP are allowed, because in many environments they are not. Now, as you can imagine or probably can guess from looking at this, when I enable these discovery protocols, I'm going to go back to my distributed switch. I can choose between CDP and LLDP. CDP is specific to Cisco; LDP is vendor-agnostic and can be used with a variety of different switches. OK, so let's browse back over to our Hosts and Clusters view. And now I've looked at some of the settings for this Vsphere distributed switch here and how it's configured. Let's take a look at my VMKernel ports for this particular ESXi host. And you can see that at the moment I've only got one VM kernel port configured. So this is my management VM kernel port. and you can see here that certain services are enabled on it. As a matter of fact, I'm going to go ahead and edit this port. Now, as you can see here, we have the TCP IPstack defined that this VM kernel port is using. You can have multiple different TCPIP stacks for an ESXi host. Let me just cancel this quickly and show it to you here. Under TCP IP configuration, I've only got one TCP IP stack defined here, but I could create multiple different TCP IP stacks. So, for example, maybe I want my management traffic to use one network, but I want my Vmotion traffic to have a different default gateway and to have a different DNS server. In those scenarios, I may want to use different TCP IP stacks for different VM kernel ports. But again, I've only got one TCP IP stack configured as my default TCP IP stack. So we're using that. And again, the most important thing for MTU is that we want to make sure that it's configured consistently in the physical network as well. And then I can choose the services that I want to enable on this VM kernel port. So first and most importantly, I have management enabled on this VM kernel port. That means that right now this VSphere client is running against V Center, and V Center is being used to manage this particular ESXi host. This is the VM kernel port that VCenter uses to talk to this ESXi host. If I were to launch the host client, or if I were to launch Putty and create an SSH session to the Csxi host, all of that traffic is hitting this management VM kernel port. So this is really important. And if anything goes wrong with this managementVM kernel port, I'm going to lose my ability to manage this ESXi host. And yeah, as you can see here, I've got a bunch of other services. I've got v. motion. So if a virtual machine is being migrated without powering it down to another EssexI host, the motion is going to send information to that other host. Fault tolerance logging is enabled on this VM colonel port as well. And you can do this. You can enable multiple services on the same VM kernel port, although in many cases, it's a little bit better to kind of create separate VM kernel ports for these things and use different VM kernel ports for different purposes. That can make it a lot easier from anetwork troubleshooting perspective to figure out what maybe isgoing wrong if something bad is happening. Here you can see the IP version four settings that I've configured on this VM kernel port. So if I'm having problems with things like Vmotion, for example, maybe I've got a misconfigured IP address for the VM kernel port, and maybe the hosts can't communicate with each other. So that's something I can come in here to troubleshoot. So I'm just going to cancel this. and here you can see some of the other properties for this VM kernel port. You can see the network label is the management network. So if we go back to our virtual switch and we look at our V-Sphere standard virtual switch, the management network that's just the port group, that's the portgroup that this VM kernel port is connected to. And the port group has a specific VLAN. In this case, we haven't set a VLAN. But yeah, so the VM kernel port is associated with a particular port group. And it's got other settings as well. Like, for example, some settings that we've covered in previous lessons, like security settings, traffic shaping timing, failover, and stuff like that. So I can verify all of those configuration settings here. So really the most common types of issues that you're going to run into with VMkernel ports, number one on the list from my experience is some misconfiguration here. Maybe I set the subnet mask wrong. Maybe I set the wrong IP address. Maybe there's some little typo here; that's a pretty common configuration issue. Or maybe I've given my VM kernel port a certain IP address, and that VM kernel port is connected to a certain port group, and maybe they're not matched up properly. Like, maybe the VLAN for this portgroup doesn't support the address range that my VM kernel port is configured for. So the traffic is hitting the physical network and can't get anywhere because it's on the wrong VLAN. That's also a potential issue that we could run into here. So for example, if 192, 168, 190, 914, if thatsubnet exists on VLAN ten and my virtual switch, theport group maybe is configured for some other VLAN. Or maybe this physical adapter doesn't have access to VLAN 10, and that's also going to break connectivity for that VM kernel port. So matching this up to the configuration of the physical network itself is also a key troubleshooting task. OK, so let's navigate back over to our Vsphere Distributed Switch in the networking view, and I'm going to click on Monitor, and under Monitor we can take a look at health here. We can see the health status of our ESXi hosts and whether or not they are configured in a manner that's consistent with the physical network. So at the moment, you can see here that the Vsphere Distributed Switch status is currently up for both of these hosts. And then I've got these three other statuses here shown for each of these hosts. The VLAN Health Status So are the VLANs that I have configured on my port groups actually accessible on the physical network? Are the VM necks connected to switch ports or trunk ports on the physical network that support the same VLANs that we've configured here? Is the physical network configured for the same maximum transmission unit? Is that configured consistently? So this screen is basically pointing out to us, "Hey, have we configured our virtual networks in a manner that is consistent with the physical network?" If we're using IP Hash as our teaming method, have we configured Port Channel on the physical network because we need to do that for it to be consistent? Or if we're using something like Source MacAsh, well, then we should not have configured the port channel on the physical network. So that's what the Health Status screen is showing us: basically, "Hey, have you configured the virtual environment in a consistent manner with the physical network environment?" So I must have some kind of configuration that's allowing this VSphere Distributed Switch to discover information about the physical network. And if I come over here to configure, you can see under Health Check that Health Check is currently enabled. I'm going to edit these settings and I'm going to say, "Let's disable this." And as a best practise from a security perspective, you should really leave these health check settings disabled under normal circumstances. But as you see here in my Vsphere Distributed Switch, I had them enabled. That was really just so that I could demo this for you. But the thought process here is, "Hey, maybe if I'm setting up some new ESXi hosts, maybe if I'm plugging into some new physical switches, maybe during that kind of time of change I can come in here and enable this health check just as a bit of a reality check to make sure that I'm configuring everything consistently." But once I validated that, I definitely recommendturning health check off on the vsphere. Distributed switch. It's not a security best practise to simply leave this enabled, but it's ideal for validating your configuration when you're making changes like adding new switches or adding new physical hosts to the Visa for Distributed Switch. That's a good time to turn Health Check on just to make sure that things are properly configured.

13. Network I/O Control (NIOC)

Network. Control requires the V-sphere distributed switch. So you can see here that we've got a V-Sphere Distributed Switch configured and running. And so I have to have that in order to enable network IO control. And the Vsphere Distributed Switch comes with the Enterprise Plus Licensing Edition of Vsphere. So network IO control allows us to ensure that certain types of traffic are granted sufficient bandwidth. So for example, in our diagram here, VM traffic is granted 100 shares. That's twice as many shares as I, scuzzy, or v. motion. So VM traffic is basically going to get double the bandwidth, but it's only going to get double the bandwidth if there's contention. Shares are only enforced when contention occurs. So during periods where bandwidth is scarce, virtual machine traffic as a whole will have access to double the bandwidth of V Motion and double the bandwidth of Icecuzzi. And you can also set limits and bandwidth reservations as well. That allows us to create more strict resource controls for bandwidth contention. But that's essentially what networkIO control is all about. We've got a finite amount of physical bandwidth, and Network IO Control is going to control which virtual machines get priority access to that bandwidth. So here we see the V sphere, seven documents, and we're looking at V sphere network IO control. And as you can see here in the documentation, I can look at different versions if I want to. We're just going to keep our focus here on Vsph Seven.Now I just want to point out that with aVsphere 6 and later, you won't notice any significant differences in this configuration. If you're working with some older Vsphere versions, you're still dealing with Network IO Control version 2. As of version six, five, and later, you should be on network IO Control, version three. So you're not going to notice a lot of monumental changes between this version and the two versions prior to it. And some of the big things about network IO Control, version 3, are: (1) it has the ability to do bandwidth resource reservations. So with network IO Control version three, we can guarantee a certain amount of bandwidth for system traffic or for groups of virtual machines. And one of the really cool things here is that VisaDRS will actually take some of these factors into account. So if DRS is trying to migrate a virtual machine to the ideal host, it will consider the bandwidth availability of the different hosts. So it's not just looking at memory and CPU—it's actually looking at that available bandwidth as well. And the documentation will walk you through all of the specifics of this, like allocating bandwidth for system traffic or allocating bandwidth for virtual machine traffic. And if we're doing virtual machine traffic, one of the things we may need to do is create a network resource pool. So if I want to provide a reservation of bandwidth to a group of virtual machines, I can set up a network resource pool to do that, and then I can add port groups to that network resource pool. So then what I'm essentially doing is configuring bandwidth reservations for all of the virtual machines that are connected to the portgroups in those network resource pools. And we can also configure bandwidth allocation on individual virtual machines as well. So we can go to an individual VM and, under the Actions menu, I can configure shares, reservations, or Actions menu,I can also configure shares, limits, and reservations on multiple virtual machines by setting up a network resource pool. And within that network resource pool, I can see all the VMs that are part of that pool, and I can configure shares, limits, and reservations. We're going to see some of this in the upcoming demo. So storage, IO control, and network I/O control are very similar. We've got a limited amount of throughput and bandwidth that we can push to our network and to our storage devices. Both of these features are going to help us to prioritise which workloads get priority access to that bandwidth.

14. Demo: Configure NIOC in vSphere 7

Here, you can see that I'm logged into the Vsphere client and I'm at the home screen. So let's start by browsing to the network area of the Vsfair client. And here's my VSphere distributed switch. And I'm going to click on the configure menu. And then under the configure menu, we can see a couple of options under resource allocation for system traffic and network resource pools. So let's start at the system traffic screen, and you can see here the total bandwidth capacity of this VSphere distributed switch. We can see the maximum reservation allowed, the configured bandwidth reservation, and the available bandwidth. And we can see here how many physical adapters we have and what the network I/O control version is here.The maximum link speed is 10 gigabits per second. And then down here I've got all of these different types of system traffic, and I've got shares associated with each of those types of system traffic. So as you can see here, by default, if we sort based on the number of shares, virtual machine traffic has been configured with 100 shares, and all of these other types of traffic have been configured with lower numbers of shares. So let's say, for example, that some of this traffic is less or more important to us. We could alter the share structure here to establish the relative priority of different types of traffic. Keep in mind that when we talk about shares, they are only enforced during times of conflict. So, for example, let's go to management traffic here, and I'm going to edit the number of shares for management traffic and set it to high instead of normal. And now I can go ahead and click Okay here. And now my management traffic and my virtual machine traffic have equal priority during times of contention. So just as much bandwidth is going to be granted to management traffic as is granted to virtual machine traffic. Now the other thing that I could do here is that I'm actually going to edit management traffic one more time because that share structure really doesn't make a whole lot of sense for me. I don't need management traffic to have the same amount of bandwidth as virtual machine traffic during times of contention. But what I may want to do is establish a reservation here. So let's say, for example, that I wanted to guarantee that there was always at least 50 megabits per second of bandwidth available for management traffic. I'm not going to establish any limit on the amount of traffic for management, but I'm just going to give it a little tiny reservation here to make sure that there's always a little bit of bandwidth available so that I can handle management traffic. How about we take a look at an example for a limit? Like, maybe I want to set a limit for Vsphere replication. So Vsphere replication can result in a lot of traffic and could potentially overwhelm the physical adapters of my ESXi host. So maybe I want to say, okay, I'm going to establish some kind of limit here. I'm going to say the limit for this type of traffic is going to be three gigabits per second at any given time, and I'm basically just placing some kind of cap on that Visa Replication traffic. Now that being said, if I'm experiencing contention, this share structure is going to help me. So I don't know if I really want to do this because the limit is very inflexible and maybe there's no bandwidth contention whatsoever. I'm still putting a cap on my Visa Replication traffic, maybe unnecessarily. So my preferred approach to this would be, okay, you know what, maybe I'm going to give this particular type of traffic a low number of shares, and then there's no cap, right? So this could be using six gigabits per second of bandwidth. But if there starts to be resource contention, the visa replication traffic will be a lower priority than these other types of traffic. So let's browse over to Network Resource Pools. nowand I'm going to create a Network Resource Pool. But you'll notice this little message that pops up right at the top of the screen. I can't do this unless I configure a binder reservation for virtual machine system traffic first. So I'm going to do that, and I'm pretty comfortable creating a reservation here. So I've got 7.45 gigabits per second of reservable bandwidth left. I'm going to reserve three gigabits per second for virtual machine traffic. That should be fine. And I'll go ahead and click on "Okay" here, and I'll go back to my network resource pools. And so I'm going to add a new network resource pool here, and I'm just going to click on Add, and I'm going to call it Demo High Priority. And at the moment, I'm not going to give it any kind of reservation. I'm just going to click Okay here. And so yeah, now I've created a network resource pool called Demo. High priority. And so now I've got this Network Resource Pool created, and I can see here in my Network Resource Pool that Demo High Priority is not currently associated with any distributed port groups. So let me go back here, and if I click on the Network Resource Pool, it'll bring me to the screen where it will show me my network resource pools in the distributed port groups that are associated with them. And so what I'm going to do is go back to the home screen of my Visa for a client. I'm going to go to Networking, and I'm going to go to one of the port groups on my VSphere distributed switch. And under configure, I can go to properties. And as you can see here, I have the ability to associate my port group with the Network Resource Pool. So I'm going to associate this portgroup with that Network Resource Pool that I just created called Demo High Priority. So now my port group is associated with the network resource pool. Let's go back to the VISA for distributed switches, back to configure, and back to network resource pools. Here's my demo. high-priority pool. If I click on that, you can see that I now have a port group associated with that. So let's just go back here and, yeah, now I've got a network resource pool. Now I have not configured any reservations for that network resource pool, and I notice the configured reservation. So what the configured reservation is showing me here is the total amount of bandwidth reserved for virtual machine system traffic. I configured this. Let's go back to the system traffic screen. I configured a three-gig reservation. However, this is showing a six-gig reservation. What's up with that? Well, basically the reason is for this feesfor a distributed switch, I've got two hostseach with a single ten gig adapter. So for each ten-gig adapter, I am reserving three gigabits per second of bandwidth, giving me a total of six. That's why that says six and not three. So maybe now what I'll think is, okay, I've got this network resource pool created. Let me edit it. I've got a maximum of six gigabits per second spread across two hosts. Maybe I will dedicate one gigabit per second to this particular port group. And now I'm setting aside some of that bandwidth; it's actually going to be half a gigabit per host. But yeah, I'm granting a network bandwidth reservation for this network resource pool, and this network resource pool is associated with one specific port group. So I am essentially doing the same by reserving that bandwidth for that particular port group. So, if I have a really high-priority portgroup that I want to ensure always has enough bandwidth, this is one way I could do it. Okay, so now I'm going to go back to my Vsphere distributed switch here, and I'm actually going to undo some of the changes that I've made. So I'm going to go to my port group, I'm going to go ahead and take away that network resourcepool, and I'm going to go back to my VCR distributed switch and undo some of these changes that I've made just because I don't want to leave them sitting around here in my lab environment. And what I also want to mention as I'm doing this is that your default option here should be "Let me just use shares." Ideally, we should just use shares to accomplish what we want to accomplish. I should try to avoid it, and it's the same thing with memory and CPU and any other kind of limits and reservations. I want to avoid utilising these reservationsand these limits because of the simplefact that they are very inflexible. And if I can just create the proper share structure here, I should never really have a need for reservations or limits because I can prioritise all of my traffic based on that share structure. So that should always be option number one. Let me reconfigure the share structure here to make it more sense. And then failing that, option two should start to configure things like limits and reservations.

15. Private VLANs (PVLAN)

In this video, I'll explain. Private VLANs Private VLANs are a feature that's supported on the VSphere distributed switch, and they can be used to isolate traffic within a VLAN. So for example, in this slide we see virtual machines that are all on the same network, the 10 1 10 network. Now maybe these virtual machines are owned by different departments or different tenants, and we need to create some sort of isolation between them. All of our virtual machines are on Primary VLAN 10. But secondary VLANs have also been created, and two of these VMs are in an isolated secondary VLAN. Now that means that these virtual machines can only communicate with virtual machines that are connected to promiscuous ports. Even virtual machines within the same secondary isolated VLAN cannot communicate with each other. They can only communicate with VMs that are connected to a promiscuous port. So maybe the two virtual machines connected to secondary VLAN 110 belong to different departments or different companies. They are isolated from one another and can only communicate with a router on a promiscuous port. We also have a community VLAN. So notice in red and blue that we have primary VLAN ten and secondary VLAN 111. And in blue, we have primary VLAN 10 and secondary VLAN 112. and those have been defined as community VLANs. VMS within the same community can connect with each other. They can communicate within their community VLAN. They can also communicate with the promiscuous VLAN. However, communities cannot communicate with each other. So for example, if one of the virtual machines in secondary VLAN 111 tries to connect to one of the virtual machines in secondary VLAN 112, that traffic will not be allowed. And again, all virtual machines in all secondary VLANs can always communicate with anything that's connected to a promiscuous VLAN.

Go to testing centre with ease on our mind when you use VMware 2V0-21.20 vce exam dumps, practice test questions and answers. VMware 2V0-21.20 Professional VMware vSphere 7.x certification practice test questions and answers, study guide, exam dumps and video training course in vce format to help you study with ease. Prepare with confidence and study using VMware 2V0-21.20 exam dumps & practice test questions and answers vce from ExamCollection.

Read More


Comments
* The most recent comment are at the top
  • Vincent
  • Malaysia
  • Jun 29, 2022

Premium dump still valid. Pass score 420

  • Jun 29, 2022
  • krishaan
  • India
  • Mar 21, 2022

is the dump valid in India

  • Mar 21, 2022
  • vCaptain
  • Spain
  • Feb 08, 2022

Do the questions fit the actual exam?

  • Feb 08, 2022
  • vCaptain
  • Spain
  • Jan 26, 2022

is the premium dump still valid?

  • Jan 26, 2022
  • Grz
  • United States
  • Nov 24, 2021

Premium is still valid as of 11/23/21. Saw every question on the exam and scored a 468.

  • Nov 24, 2021

Add Comment

Feel Free to Post Your Comments About EamCollection VCE Files which Include VMware 2V0-21.20 Exam Dumps, Practice Test Questions & Answers.

Purchase Individually

2V0-21.20 Premium File

Premium File
2V0-21.20 Premium File
109 Q&A
$76.99$69.99

2V0-21.20 Training Video Course

Training Course
2V0-21.20 Training Video Course
100 Lectures
$27.49$24.99

2V0-21.20 Study Guide

Study Guide
2V0-21.20 Study Guide
1129 PDF Pages
$27.49$24.99

Top VMware Certifications

Site Search:

 

VISA, MasterCard, AmericanExpress, UnionPay

SPECIAL OFFER: GET 10% OFF

ExamCollection Premium

ExamCollection Premium Files

Pass your Exam with ExamCollection's PREMIUM files!

  • ExamCollection Certified Safe Files
  • Guaranteed to have ACTUAL Exam Questions
  • Up-to-Date Exam Study Material - Verified by Experts
  • Instant Downloads
Enter Your Email Address to Receive Your 10% Off Discount Code
A Confirmation Link will be sent to this email address to verify your login
We value your privacy. We will not rent or sell your email address

SPECIAL OFFER: GET 10% OFF

Use Discount Code:

MIN10OFF

A confirmation link was sent to your e-mail.
Please check your mailbox for a message from support@examcollection.com and follow the directions.

Next

Download Free Demo of VCE Exam Simulator

Experience Avanset VCE Exam Simulator for yourself.

Simply submit your e-mail address below to get started with our interactive software demo of your free trial.

Free Demo Limits: In the demo version you will be able to access only first 5 questions from exam.