Pass Your CompTIA ITF+ FC0-U61 Exam Easy!

100% Real CompTIA ITF+ FC0-U61 Exam Questions & Answers, Accurate & Verified By IT Experts

Instant Download, Free Fast Updates, 99.6% Pass Rate

FC0-U61 Premium Bundle

$79.99

CompTIA FC0-U61 Premium Bundle

FC0-U61 Premium File: 405 Questions & Answers

Last Update: Nov 30, 2023

FC0-U61 Training Course: 63 Video Lectures

FC0-U61 PDF Study Guide: 1006 Pages

FC0-U61 Bundle gives you unlimited access to "FC0-U61" files. However, this does not replace the need for a .vce exam simulator. To download VCE exam simulator click here
CompTIA FC0-U61 Premium Bundle
CompTIA FC0-U61 Premium Bundle

FC0-U61 Premium File: 405 Questions & Answers

Last Update: Nov 30, 2023

FC0-U61 Training Course: 63 Video Lectures

FC0-U61 PDF Study Guide: 1006 Pages

$79.99

FC0-U61 Bundle gives you unlimited access to "FC0-U61" files. However, this does not replace the need for a .vce exam simulator. To download your .vce exam simulator click here

CompTIA ITF+ FC0-U61 Exam Screenshots

CompTIA ITF+ FC0-U61 Practice Test Questions in VCE Format

File Votes Size Date
File
CompTIA.questionspaper.FC0-U61.v2023-10-13.by.aria.124q.vce
Votes
1
Size
117.8 KB
Date
Oct 13, 2023
File
CompTIA.examlabs.FC0-U61.v2022-01-13.by.orla.112q.vce
Votes
1
Size
113.9 KB
Date
Jan 13, 2022
File
CompTIA.passguide.FC0-U61.v2021-09-02.by.max.96q.vce
Votes
1
Size
90.7 KB
Date
Sep 02, 2021
File
CompTIA.selftestengine.FC0-U61.v2021-04-28.by.eliza.80q.vce
Votes
1
Size
87.36 KB
Date
Apr 28, 2021
File
CompTIA.Braindumps.FC0-U61.v2019-01-18.by.Marcus.33q.vce
Votes
3
Size
40.63 KB
Date
Jan 22, 2019

CompTIA ITF+ FC0-U61 Practice Test Questions, Exam Dumps

CompTIA FC0-U61 CompTIA IT Fundamentals exam dumps vce, practice test questions, study guide & video training course to study and pass quickly and easily. CompTIA FC0-U61 CompTIA IT Fundamentals exam dumps & practice test questions and answers. You need avanset vce exam simulator in order to study the CompTIA ITF+ FC0-U61 certification exam dumps & CompTIA ITF+ FC0-U61 practice test questions in vce format.

Data Storage and Sharing

4. AMA - Ask Me Anything About Data Storage and Sharing

I wanted to take some time to hear from you and answer questions you might have on computer fundamentals or computer literacy. So that's why we put together these Ask Me Anything episodes. My friend Aaron is going to ask questions about stuff in this chapter from viewers like you. I also want to hear from you as well. My email is at the end of the episode. Ask me anything. Dan from Mountain View, California, was wondering, "Do I need to buy a compatible external hard drive for my Mac?" Good question, Dan. If you ask Apple, they'd say yes, come to the Apple Store and buy one of our fancy, expensive ones. But the true answer is no. Okay. The hard drive technology and how the files and stuff are saved on the external hard drives are pretty much the same. They act like thumb drives on steroids. You just plug them into a USB port on your laptop or on your desktop computer. That's where you get some differences, though. There are several USB standards, and which port you connect that USB device to depends on what kind of device you have and what standard it is capable of running, whether it's USBTwo, USB Three, or three ones. So, for example, if I take a nice, new USB three-terabyte external hard drive and plug it into my black USB port, it will run at 480 megabits per second. Oh, no. Exactly right. If I unplug it and plug it into a blue port, it'll run at five gigabits per second. So the difference is astonishing, depending on which port you plug it into. The latest USB connectors, USB 3.0 and USB Type-C connectors, are going to give you the biggest bang for your buck. So if you have that on your computer, get that kind of device, and it'll run, what, ten gigabits per second. So, really great data transfer rates That's good to know. Okay, Terry from Cherry, Hearst, New York, asks, "What's the difference between CV, DVD, and Bluray?" The biggest difference is capacity. CDs are going to give you up to 700 megabytes of storage space. DVDs are 4.7GB or maybe 9GB, depending on the type of DVD. Bluray is going to give you the most space. At 50GB of storage, it's still pretty tiny compared to any kind of hard drive. Okay, so I'm going to buy a new PC. Should I buy an external harddrive or a solid state drive? Okay, that's a good question. And it boils down to two things. How much money do you have? Of course not. Really? No, I'm kidding. how much money you have and are willing to spend, and the needs of that computer. A hard drive is your standard storage, and it's been around for a long time, so you're going to get the most capacity for the lowest amount of money. when you go with a hard disc drive. Okay. Performance-wise, an SSD will blow hard drives away. I mean, it's astonishing, the difference. So if you can afford an SSD and get one big enough for your needs, an SSD is definitely the way to go. I see. Okay. Also, I had my family movies converted to digital, and it's huge. What can I do to be able to share, like, a terabyte of information or data with my family? And your family is all located here? Oh, no. All over. Okay. Terabyte, huh? You could put it on some kind of removable media, like a Blu-ray disk. But a terabyte is going to beā€”that's a lot of disks. Right. And you have to print discs for every family member. 50 discs to send to Aunt Susan and another 50 to send to Uncle Bill. Right, right. Yeah. And what if you want to change things? Right. as you're going through your movies? You get more. Yeah. So you could use external hard drives. Right. How many family members do you have? too many to count. Okay. All right. So for the hard drive, that would add up pretty quickly. Yes. An alternative is that you could go with the cloud. You could go with external storage. As an example, there are different companies like Dropbox or Amazon that enable you to put stuff online and then share that stuff with friends and family. So that's cool. The key here, though, is that storage costs money, however you're going to do it. So, if you use one of the online services, servers and fancy computers are set up to house all of these different drives. And of course, that cost them money. Right. And so they charge you money. So they will charge you a monthly fee to be able to store that much stuff up in the cloud. A completely different option is to go do you have high-speed Internet? Yes. Okay. So you could get what's called a network-attached storage, or NAS, device. This is a 2346 hard drive machine that is special. A NAS is more than just a backup hard drive because it comes with smarts. It's internet aware.It has its own operating system. So you can do things like store all of the movies and stuff on this network-attached storage, plug it into your network, set up accounts, and then send that account information, the login information, to your friends and family. I like that idea. Right. Because that would be very cool. They could just log in using the high-speed Internet that you already pay for, right? as your connection. So that sounds perfect. Yeah. So the only drawback to doing the NAS as opposed to doing online storage is, where do you live in Houston? Houston. Okay. So what's our natural disaster here? Hurricane. Yeah. So what happens if a hurricane comes and your house is wet? I don't know, but I don't want to lose everything. Right. Okay. So that means you need to have some kind of external backup. So whether it's making one copy on a terabyte hard drive and mailing that to your aunt Susan Right. So there's another copy somewhere else for the family, so that would be good. Okay, well, that sounds good to me. Excellent. That's it for chapter four. Thank you. Wow.

Understanding Operating Systems

1. Operating System Functions

Computing devices come in all shapes and sizes, from handheld to desktop, from gas pumps to supermarket checkout machines. Every computing device has an operating system. when it comes to personal computing devices. We have Windows, Mac OS, Chrome OS, Linux, iOS, Android, and Windows Phone. Let's push this a little farther. Every operating system offers the same four features. It provides a user interface and provides coordination among hardware components. It monitors health and functionality, and it provides a way to store and retrieve data. Let's spend the rest of this episode looking at examples. An operating system enables the input, output, and processing hardware to work together to get stuff done. A tablet computer provides a perfect example. The operating system and the hardware are intimately entwined. It's all one unit, right? Every operating system provides some way for you to interact with the machine. That's pretty obvious when you think about a standard Windows computer. Windows provides icons to click to open programmes and has a nice desktop screen for output, so you can see what's happening. But what about the smartphone? The machine and the interface are all melded together. iOS shows all your apps. The touch screen tells iOS that you want to load an app like Safari and then surf the Internet. iOS enables you to swipe left or right to switch apps. That's the operating system providing a user interface. no one else, really. Here's a Windows PC running a game where the player races against other people over a network. We have a whole lot of hardware working here. The joystick helps steer, accelerate, and brake. The internal processing components take that input and shoot it out through the monitor and speakers. Plus, the network interface has to work to keep all the players informed about each other. How do all these hardware components talk? Magic? Of course not. The operating system enables all these devices to communicate. Only the operating system has the programming to handle this task. A computer can show a lot more than that, though. This Windows computer has a utility called HW Monitor installed that shows a tonne of detail, from the core temperatures of components to electrical usage to fan speeds and a whole lot more. Every operating system enables data storage and retrieval. An operating system creates structures for saving files and folders, plus naming systems that enable you to access what you've saved. The desktop on my macOS computer, for example, has a hard drive icon clearly labeled. My system says Macintosh HD. Double click it to open the folder structure for the drive. Click one of the links on the left, such as All My Files, to see the contents of that container. But what about a device like a Chromebook? That's a computer designed primarily to run, always connected to the Internet using web-based tools and cloud storage. Does it create data storage structures and names? The simple answer is yes. Of course it does. But it looks a little different from what you might expect on a PC or Mac. To see the storage structures, open All Apps and click the Files app. Click the My Drive icon to view your online files. You can search here or sort by various options. I could show you many more examples of computing devices that exhibit all four of these functions, but why don't you do some fieldwork? What computing devices do you use? In the car, the supermarket, or the gas station? Do all of them feature an AUSER interface and coordinated hardware? Do they monitor system health? Do they enable data storage and retrieval? Check your devices.

2. Operating System Interfaces

And in fact, desktop and laptop operating systems look and smell very much alike. The mobile operating systems also look and act similarly. Unfortunately, the operating system developers have no agreement on what to call things users interact with. This episode walks through the same common task six times. In the process, I'll point out the names of features in six operating systems: Windows, MacOS, Linux, Chrome OS, iOS, and Android. The goal is for you to nod sagely when a Mac user friend says, "I popped open the Safari icon on the dock and then typed in the website I wanted," and as a Windows user, instantly equate that statement with, "I clicked on the Edge icon in the taskbar and then typed in the website I wanted. Here. I have a Windows 10 machine. I want to accomplish a typical task, which is to open a web browser, access a non-political, safe for work and school, colourful website that looks good on camera, and download a picture that I can make into my background. So run a program, have that programme do something, and access the results of that action. Microsoft Edge is the default browser for Windows Ten. To run the application, I can click here in the Start menu, the application centre for the forever version of Windows, and there's Edge. Conversely, I can click the Edge icon in the taskbar. That's the location for pinned programmes and running applications. Or I can type Edge, and Windows knows what I want. Let's access a photo site, sort of randomly selected, called Smugmug.com navigate to find the photo I want, then right-click it to download. Now I'm going to access the file explorer in the taskbar, navigate to Pictures, and there it is. Let's try the same thing again. Safari is the default browser in macOS. I can access it in a couple of ways. I can click Finder, then click Applications, and select Safari from the apps listed. Conversely, I can click Launchpad and find Safari, or I can do what everybody does and click the Safari icon from the dock. That's this bar at the bottom of the screen. From here, I follow the same path to a website and the picture download. Right-click, save the picture, and then access Finder to get to the picture. Sweet. Here's a Linux system. The main tools are on the left side of the screen. in this distro. They vary, so you might see a different layout. A lot of them use Mozilla Firefox as their default Web browser. Let's hit the website. Right-clicking on the image does the same thing as on other platforms. Now let's access the picture through Files, which in Ubuntu is secretly called Nautilus. And there you go. Now I'm on Chrome OS. On my Chromebook, there's no taskbar or dock, just some common icons for applications. Not surprisingly, Chrome is the default browser. Go to the SmugMug website, navigate to the folder by right-clicking on the image, and then download Access using files. Here's an iPhone running iOS. Like other Apple products, iPhones use Safari as their default browser. Tap the app, conveniently located in the dock. To open it, let's navigate to the website and find the picture. Touch the screen and you'll get the option to save the file. It will show up in pictures. Here's. a smartphone running Android. This implementation uses Chrome for browsing. Let's access the website one more time and select a picture. Touch the picture to get the option to download; it'll show up as pictures. So the taskbar or dock, the start screen, or the Finder The names change, but the functions are remarkably similar in all six operating systems covered in this episode.

3. AMA - Ask Me Anything About Understanding OS's

I wanted to take some time to hear from you and answer questions you might have on computer fundamentals or computer literacy. So that's why we put together these Ask Me Anything episodes. My friend Aaron is going to ask questions about stuff in this chapter from viewers like you. I also want to hear from you as well. My email is at the end of the episode. Ask me anything. Okay, well, Vanessa from Lincoln, Nebraska, wants to know: how do I find out which version of Windows I'm running? It's surprisingly easy. There is a tool called the System Applet in Windows that you can get to. It's in Control Panel, but you can also get there just by typing System, and it'll pop up; click System, and it'll open. the system applet. The System Applet will tell you whether you have a 32-bit or 64-bit version of Windows. It'll tell you what version of Windows you have, preferably Windows Ten. It'll also tell you things about your hardware, like what kind of CPU you have and how much RAM you have. Wow. The system is very cool. for a quick snapshot of what you're running. Awesome. That's good to know. Next up, we have Winston from Cincinnati, Ohio, asking, "I want to run Mac OS and Windows OS on the same machine." Is that even possible? It's absolutely possible if you are running a Mac. Okay. The hardware in PCs and Macs is almost identical. Mac is designed by Apple to run very specific software, and all the drivers and other stuff are built into the operating system. You can run software on the Mac, like Boot Camp, for example. You can then install Windows on the Macintosh. So you essentially have a dual boot machine, which is absolutely cool. If you need support for running a Windows programme that you can't find a Macintosh version. Right. Like a lot of games, this is important stuff. Windows PCs have so much hardware variation that maybe some high-end tech could figure out a way to install a copy of Mac OS on a Windows machine. But he might be writing his own drivers and doing it himself. Yeah, it's crazy. So for our intents and purposes, yes, on an Apple Mac. Got you. No, on a Windows PC. I see. Charlie from Portland, Oregon, asks, "I just switched from Windows Seven to Windows Ten, and now the Start menu has all these little tiles." What's with that? Let's take a little trip down memory lane. When Microsoft made the switch from Windows Seven to Windows 8, they envisioned trying to take advantage of the craze at that time where all of us were getting smartphones and tablets and getting used to that really great interface where we reach down and touch our tiles and stuff to make apps run. Right. So they created Windows Eight to be a tablet-like operating system. Okay. The problem in practise is that if you had a touchscreen, the way you interacted with Windows Eight was to reach out and touch tiles. When you're reaching out and touching tiles across your desktop, however, you might get some really buff arms. Yeah, we call them gorilla arms. And people just didn't do it. Microsoft rapidly realised that that was not going to work. And so then they started changing Windows 8. They changed it to Windows Eight One, but they added some Windows Seven-like features to it and made it a little more mouse friendly.But then they finally got it right, I think, with Windows Ten. But they wanted to leave some of the tablet's cool-looking features. So they have live tiles on there for apps that are aware of Windows 10 that were written specifically for the Windows 10 interface. So that's the origin of those. Interesting. Yeah, now I know. Okay, up next is Dwight from Detroit, Michigan. He wants to know that I sold my old laptop on eBay after making sure to wipe all my personal information off of it. If somebody does something bad on my old laptop, can I be blamed? The short answer is no. Good. All right, that's a good answer. Let me explain why. Licenses from macOS, from Apple, and from Microsoft are designed to go with the machines that have the operating system installed on them. It's like a car, right? If you sell a car, you're no longer responsible for that car or what happens when other drivers use that car. It's the same way with computers. So sell that computer happily, and somebody else will get great use out of it, and you don't have to worry at all. That's a good relief. And that's all I have for Chapter Six. Thank you, Scott. Thank you, Erin. And thank you.

Setting Up and Configuring a PC

1. Preparing the Work Area

Other considerations include the environment, power, networking, and ergonomics. Computers get hot. All that electricity flowing through computing components generates heat. You need to control the environment in the work area. Now, people and computers can tolerate a pretty wide range of temperature and humidity, but for overall comfort and computing excellence, the baseline is 72 degrees Fahrenheit and 40 percent humidity. If your office still uses wired networking, make sure the desk is situated conveniently so you can run a cable from the computer to the wall. Jack, what's wrong with this picture? Throughout this episode, I've been doing this, looking down at this monitor. That's poor placement or bad ergonomics. The monitor should be between 16 and 24 inches away from the user, which in this case it is. But also, the top of the monitor should line up at about eye level, and in this case, it's about four inches too low. So I would put something underneath it to raise it up. And of course, that will adjust. Depending on your employee's height, The desk and typing area should be situated so your wrists aren't bent one way or another. In addition, the height of your chair should be such that your legs are at 90 degrees and your feet are flat on the floor. It's good at ergonomics and will keep your employees healthy.

Go to testing centre with ease on our mind when you use CompTIA ITF+ FC0-U61 vce exam dumps, practice test questions and answers. CompTIA FC0-U61 CompTIA IT Fundamentals certification practice test questions and answers, study guide, exam dumps and video training course in vce format to help you study with ease. Prepare with confidence and study using CompTIA ITF+ FC0-U61 exam dumps & practice test questions and answers vce from ExamCollection.

Read More


Add Comment

Feel Free to Post Your Comments About EamCollection VCE Files which Include CompTIA ITF+ FC0-U61 Exam Dumps, Practice Test Questions & Answers.

Purchase Individually

FC0-U61 Premium File

Premium File
FC0-U61 Premium File
405 Q&A
$76.99$69.99

FC0-U61 Training Video Course

Training Course
FC0-U61 Training Video Course
63 Lectures
$27.49$24.99

FC0-U61 Study Guide

Study Guide
FC0-U61 Study Guide
1006 PDF Pages
$27.49$24.99

Top CompTIA Certifications

Site Search:

 

VISA, MasterCard, AmericanExpress, UnionPay

SPECIAL OFFER: GET 10% OFF

ExamCollection Premium

ExamCollection Premium Files

Pass your Exam with ExamCollection's PREMIUM files!

  • ExamCollection Certified Safe Files
  • Guaranteed to have ACTUAL Exam Questions
  • Up-to-Date Exam Study Material - Verified by Experts
  • Instant Downloads
Enter Your Email Address to Receive Your 10% Off Discount Code
A Confirmation Link will be sent to this email address to verify your login
We value your privacy. We will not rent or sell your email address

SPECIAL OFFER: GET 10% OFF

Use Discount Code:

MIN10OFF

A confirmation link was sent to your e-mail.
Please check your mailbox for a message from support@examcollection.com and follow the directions.

Next

Download Free Demo of VCE Exam Simulator

Experience Avanset VCE Exam Simulator for yourself.

Simply submit your e-mail address below to get started with our interactive software demo of your free trial.

Free Demo Limits: In the demo version you will be able to access only first 5 questions from exam.