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VMware 1V0-701 Practice Test Questions, Exam Dumps

VMware 1V0-701 VMware Certified Associate - Digital Business Transformation (VCA-DBT) exam dumps vce, practice test questions, study guide & video training course to study and pass quickly and easily. VMware 1V0-701 VMware Certified Associate - Digital Business Transformation (VCA-DBT) exam dumps & practice test questions and answers. You need avanset vce exam simulator in order to study the VMware 1V0-701 certification exam dumps & VMware 1V0-701 practice test questions in vce format.

VMware Certified Associate 6 (Retired)

1. Virtual Machine Concepts

In this video, we'll explore VSphere 6 virtual machine concepts, and the VMware certified associate exam is still focused on VSphere 6. So we're not really going to get into any specifics when it comes to VSphere 6, dot 5, in this or any other lesson in this course. So a virtual machine is very similar to a physical machine in many ways. A virtual machine has an operating system installed on it, and that operating system needs access to a CPU, memory, network interface cards, and storage. And the guest operating system of our virtual machine has no idea that it's running within a VM. So the goal here is basically to trick the guest operating system into thinking that it has real hardware. So let's assume in this scenario that our guest operating system is Windows. And we see in the little purple box that we've got a Windows virtual machine. Windows needs a CPU and memory in order to execute. So we'll allocate a certain amount of those resources to this virtual machine. And Windows also needs a C drive for us to install the operating system on and space to store files. so we will present virtual discs to it. And our virtual machine also needs to transmit traffic on the network. And in order to do that, Windows needs to see a network interface card. So we'll install some network interface card drivers and Windows, and present an adapter to the guest operating system. And as far as Windows, or whatever guest operating system we happen to be using, is concerned, this virtual hardware seems exactly the same as physical hardware. Now one of the resources that we're going to present to our virtual machines is CPU and memory. So let's assume in this scenario that our Windows virtual machine has been created with two virtual CPUs and has been allocated 8GB of memory. What that essentially means is that this virtual machine is going to be able to utilise the CPU resources of two physical processor cores, or PCI physical CPUs. That's all we're saying. So if we create a virtual machine with two virtual CPUs, we're not guaranteeing it will run at full speed over those physical processors. There may be other virtual machines that it's sharing those processors with. What we're saying when we give a virtual machine to virtual CPUs is that we're saying you're allowed to use two physical processor cores if they're available. They might not be available. They might be used by other virtual machines. So we're not making any guarantees here. and the same concept goes with memory. We may create a Windows VM and give it eight gigs of memory, and that's what Windows will see. Windows will see two processors and eight gigabytes of memory. But again, we're not guaranteeing this VM eight gigabytes of memory. And by the way, the VM is only going to take up the physical memory that it actually needs. So if this particular VM is only using four gigs of memory, At the moment, that's all that will take place on the EF Xi host. This is referred to as thin provisioning of memory, and our virtual discs operate in a similar manner. Again, we're going to trick our guest operating system. So just like memory and the CPU, the virtual machine doesn't really have any actual hardware. It's accessing a shared resource, and in this case, that resource is called a data store. Windows needs to see storage hardware, so we'll trick Windows into thinking it has a SCSI controller and provide drivers for a virtual SCSI controller. So when Windows needs to read and write data, it generates SCSI commands, and those SCSI commands are set to the virtual SCSI controller, which is basically fake hardware. And when those scuzzy commands arrive at the virtual scuzzy controller, it's the job of our ESXi host to redirect those commands towards the appropriate storage location. That's how we achieve storage virtualization. And this is an important slide to understand because if you really understand this slide, you kind of get the whole concept of virtualization. This is a virtual machine that believes it has disks, believes it has memory, and believes it has a CPU. The guest operating system doesn't know that in reality, all of those resources are actually shared resources that are used by many other virtual machines. And that's the whole point of what we see here with the hypervisor and the layer of abstraction. Decoupling those resources from the virtual machine gives us flexibility. It means that we can take these virtual machine's files and move them to some other data store. And if we choose to do that now, what happens as a side effect is that the virtual machine does not know the difference, right? Windows does not know the difference. If I take these virtual machine files and put them on some other data store up here, then the next thing is that next time a scuzzy command comes out, the hypervisor will be aware of that and we'll direct it towards the appropriate storage location. But as far as the VM can tell, nothing has changed. It's still got its virtual scuzzy controller, and that's how the storage traffic is still getting from point A to point B. So from Windows' perspective, nothing changes even if I relocate the files that make up that virtual machine. So the whole objective here is to trick the guest operating system into thinking it has real hardware, when in reality it truly doesn't. and giving us this layer of abstraction in the middle to allow us some managerial capabilities. and the concept is very similar with networking. So just like CPU, memory, and storage, the VM doesn't have any dedicated physical hardware. It's going to access a shared resource. And in this case, the shared resource that's going to be utilised is the physical adapters of the ESXi host. And here we see a virtual switch with some physical adapters. So when you have a bunch of VMs running on an ESXi host That host might have some Ethernet ports on it. That's what these are; that's what my physical adapters are. But this is still a Windows Virtual Machine. And if Windows is going to send traffic on the network, then Windows needs to see a network interface card. So that's part one of this equation: to fool Windows into thinking it's got a physical network interface card. So we'll present a virtual nick to this guest operating system, and when the virtual machine sends traffic out to the network, the guest operating system is going to send that traffic to the virtual nic. And from there, the traffic will flow out of the VM and be relayed to the virtual switch that this VM is associated with. And the virtual switch is actually assigned to VMIX or physical adapters so that, if necessary, that traffic can be switched out to the physical network to maybe some destination physical server or something along those lines. And then finally, we can also connect USB devices; we can connect ISO images to our virtual machines, so we have a wide variety of different storage options and other sorts of hardware that we can integrate with this VM. Okay, so in review, we learn that virtual machines are presented with virtual hardware, and the guest operating system is essentially being tricked by this virtual hardware. So the guest operating system has no idea that it's actually running as a virtual machine. The current version with Vsphere six was virtual hardware version eleven. We also learned a little bit about virtual disks. Now, as we progress through the course, we'll learn more about how storage works and the differences between thin and thickly provisioned disks. and we'll have much more on that. If you ever take the Visa Six Foundation course that should be coming out shortly, we'll have a lot more detailed information in there about virtual disc types. And then finally, a virtual NIC is also provided to our virtual machines as well. There's a specific type of virtual NIC called the VMX net Three that's recommended in most cases, but regardless of the type of virtual NIC that you use, the concept is still the same. We're presenting a fake virtual network interface card to our.

2. Introduction to vCenter

In this video, I'll explain the role of VCenter, the Platform Services Controller, and how they are used to manage our ESXi hosts. So here we see a little diagram, and basically the point of this diagram is to illustrate that V Center is used to manage our entire VSphere environment. So in the big green box here, that represents V Center, and then within it, I might have multiple virtual data centres that include ESXi hosts, virtual machines, data stores, virtual switches, and all of these different components that make up my virtual data center. But VCenter is the top level of administration. I can use it to manage many ESXi hosts at once. My Vsphere Web Client is also hosted by Vcenter. So technically, we could actually manage individual ESXi hosts using the VSphere client. But as the environment continues to grow, this starts to become really impractical. So VCenter gives us that central management system so that we can control everything at once from one unified web client. And not only does VCenter give us our central management capability, but it also makes certain features possible. You can't do V. Motion storage, motion high availability, fault tolerance, storage DLS, and many other features require a data centre to be available. So V Center is not just a management platform; it unlocks a lot of capabilities that are not possible if we choose to not deploy V Center. So we have a few different options for how we can actually create our VCenter server. There's the VCenter Server appliance, or we can deploy VCenter on a Windows machine. And the first option is to set up a Windows virtual machine and install V Center on it, so we can install the centre on top of any of the supported versions of Windows. This does require a Windows license, of course, and because it's running on a virtual machine, we can protect VCenter with either high availability or fault tolerance. So we can give ourselves the ability to recover from the failure of an ESXi host. Now, we could also potentially deploy VCenter on a physical server running Windows, and this gives us complete segmentation of management. We've got our management server running on a separate physical device, and this might be required for compliance purposes, but it's usually not recommended because we can't protect the physical server with high availability or fault tolerance. So it doesn't have the same level of redundancy that a virtual machine would give us. Now, an option that's becoming more and more popular is to configure a VCenter Server appliance. And the VCenter Server appliance is a prebuilt, preconfigured virtual appliance that's designed to run VCenter. Basically, you download it, you import it to run on an ESXi host, and you immediately have a complete VCenter configuration that is very easy to install and very easy to upgrade, and it's a virtual machine that can be protected with high availability or fault tolerance. And we don't require a Windows license. So traditionally, the Windows Vcenter has been more popular because it has a higher set of features. It was compatible with additional databases. It could support more virtual machines and more ESXi hosts. But now we have feature parity between the two. So you may need to know a couple of things about the supported databases really quickly. The Windows version of VCenter supports Microsoft SQL, Oracle, or a bundled database. The bundle database can be scaled up to a maximum of 20 hosts or 200 virtual machines. Whereas the V Center Server appliance does not support SQL, it supports Oracle, and it also supports an embedded database. And that embedded database is just as scalable as any of these external databases are. So now the V Center Server appliance with an embedded database scales just as high as any of the other options do. So for the purposes of the VMware Certified Associate Exam, what you really need to know is, number one, that VCenter provides our central management system for all of our ESXi hosts, all of our virtual machines, and all of our data stores. You also need to know that Vcenter is required for certain features like high availability, fault tolerance, and a distributed resource scheduler, and you need to understand that it's used to manage our physical ESXi hosts. So those are the actual hosts. That's my virtual machine.

3. Demo: Client Integration Plugin

In this video, I'm going to demonstrate the installation of the Client Integration Plugin. So you'll notice that I've launched the website for my views for a webcam, and down at the bottom left, you'll notice that we have this little link to download the Client Integration Plugin again. And if I click on this link, what it's going to do is simply start downloading a file. So I'm going to go ahead and save this file to a folder location—my downloads folder. And as you can see, I downloaded this a long time ago. I'm going to go ahead and replace that copy with a new copy of the Client Integration Plugin. What the Client Integration Plugin does is allow certain features of the Vsfar Web Client to work. For example, you'll notice here that if I'm going to log into the VS for Web Client, I can check this box to use my Windows session authentication. And what that means is that if I'm already logged into a Windows machine with credentials that can also be used for the Vsphere Web Client, I can simply pass those credentials through and I won't have to authenticate again. Okay, so let's take a look at my Downloads folder here. And here you can see the VMware Client Integration Plugin Installer. I'm going to go ahead and launch it, and you'll notice I'm going to have a problem during the installation because I've got Internet Explorer running in the background. So you can't install the Client Integration Plugin while you've got one of your browsers up and running. So I'm going to just go ahead and try now that I've closed out Internet Explorer. And so what it's giving me here is the option to remove, change, or repair. my installation because I've already got a preexisting installation of the VMware Client Integration Plugin installed. So I'm just going to leave my current installation of the Client Integration Plugin intact. I'm actually not going to change it at all. What I really wanted to show you in this demonstration is the fact that if you want to launch the Client Integration Plugin installer, you have to make sure you close out of Internet Explorer. You can't have any browser windows open. And I also want you to understand a couple of critical things about the Client Integration Plugin. Number one, it allows you to pass through those Windows session credentials. That means you might only have to log in once, and you can just use the credentials you've already used to log in to Windows. So now that we've successfully logged into the Visa WebClient, let's take a look at a couple of things that we can do using this Client Integration Plugin. I'm going to go to Hosts and Clusters, and there are a couple of tasks that we need the Client Integration Plugin in order to perform. And one of those tasks is to deploy a virtual appliance. So let's say, for example, we have a prebuilt virtual machine that is deployed as an OVF template, and I now want to import that virtual machine into my VCenter inventory. Well, I can do that by simply going to an EsXi host and right clicking it, and I can say, "I want to deploy an OVF template," and I can browse to a location on my computer where that OVF template is installed. Well, it won't allow me to do this unless I have the Client Integration Plugin installed here. It's telling me I can either download the client integration plugin and go ahead and install it. Now, if you've already installed the Client Integration Plug-in and you're getting this prompt, my recommendation is to go ahead and launch the Client Integration Plug-in installation and completely remove whatever you currently have installed. You want to completely remove any remnants of the Client Integration Plugin and reinstall it from scratch. So, now that I've explained the basics of the Client Integration Plugin, one last final item that you may want to be aware of for the VMware Certified Associate exam is that we need that Client Integration Plugin to also go ahead and launch a remote console for this virtual machine. So, at the moment, I am unable to actually open a console on this virtual machine; if I get the Client Integration Plugin installed and functioning properly, that will no longer be an issue.

4. Demo: Create a new VM

In this video, I'll demonstrate how to create a new virtual machine in the VSphere web client. So I'm going to go to the Host and Clusters view, and within that view, I'm just going to choose an ESXi host that I want my new virtual machine to run on. I'll right-click it and choose "Choose a new virtual machine." And now I'm going to simply create a new virtual machine, right? I don't want to deploy a virtual machine from a template. Now, if I build a preexisting template and want to make a copy of it as a new virtual machine, I can do that. Or maybe I want to clone some existing virtual machine. I can do that as well. But what I want to demonstrate in this video is how to create a new virtual machine from scratch. So I'll choose Create a New Virtual Machine and hit Next. And then I'll simply give my virtual machine a name. I'm going to call it Rick Precidemo, and I'll choose the virtual data centre that the virtual machine will reside in. If I had created any virtual machine folders, I could choose a folder here, but I don't have any of those. And I'll pick the ESXi host that the virtual machine is going to run on. Then I can go ahead and select the datastore that the virtual machine's files will reside on. And as you can see here, I only have one data store. It's a really small one as well. So I'm going to pick my only data store that's available and go ahead and choose the virtual machine hardware version. So because I know that this virtual machine is going to run on an ESXi 6.0 host, I'll choose virtual machine hardware version eleven. If I have some older hosts in my inventory that this virtual machine may need to run on from time to time, like, let's say, I might have to V motion it to a five-dot-five host, I may choose an older virtual hardware version so that this virtual machine will actually be compatible with those older hosts as well. So if I create a virtual machine and it's on hardware version ten, that means it'll work on ESXi Five and ESXi Six dot O. If I choose a virtual machine that's on hardware version eleven, it will only be compatible with ESXi 60 and later. For my purposes, that's fine. So I'm going to choose the newest virtual hardware version. Hardware Version Eleven, I'll hit Next, and then I'll specify the guest operating system that I'm going to install on this virtual machine. And this is an important part of virtual machine creation. Now, we're not actually installing the guest operating system here. What we're doing is telling the virtual machine: This is the guest OS that will be installed eventually. And the reason for this is because think about it this way. What we're doing when we create a new virtual machine like this is essentially putting together the virtual hardware. We're going to give it a certain number of CPUs. We're going to connect it to a network and do all that sort of stuff. We have to pick the right hardware to match our guest operating system. So it's important to tell VSphere what to expect here, right? And so I'll say, you know, in this case, the guest operating system that I'm eventually going to install is going to be server 20, 12, 64 bit, and then I can go through the process of customising my virtual machine hardware. And of course, it's not going to like the size of the virtual disc because I don't really have very much space on my data store. So I'm going to override that and give it a really small disk. In real life, this wouldn't really work out, but I'm going to give it 500 mg of memory and just kind of make it work in my lab environment. And the other thing that we would do here in real life is I would go ahead and, on my CD/DVD drive, I might connect it to a data store ISO file. So maybe I've got some ISO images for different Windows operating systems or different bootable ISO images that I can use to go ahead and fire up these virtual machines and install the appropriate guest operating system. So if that's the case, I'll go ahead and install these ISO images on some of my data stores. And what that will give me the ability to do is to say, "Okay, I'm going to connect this ISO image at power on, and it'll be just like taking a Windows CD and putting it in the CD drive." It will allow my virtual machine to boot from this ISO image that will automatically connect to PowerOn and go ahead and install Windows. So that's one of my other options here. If I want to force this VM to automatically boot from an ISO image whenever I finish creating it and then go ahead and go through the Windows installation wizard, I can have that automatically happen. And I can also choose some other settings like what network I want to connect the virtual machine to and what type of virtual NIC I want to use. I'll pick all of those hardware settings, and then I'll go ahead and also select the number of CPUs. In this case, I'm going to stick with one. I'll hit Next. And at that point, I can go ahead and finish Ican go ahead and finish it and create this virtual machine. And so, as you'll see in a moment, A new virtual machine appears here on the left. And right now, the virtual machine is in the process of being created. I can then go ahead and power it on. And I now have a new virtual machine that's powered on, ready to go. And I can go ahead and install the guest operating system. As you can see here, my virtual machine actually failed to power on. So let's use this as an opportunity to explain why. And so let's go back a little bit here. My virtual machine failed to power on. Let's try it one more time. And when it fails to power on, you can see that I get an error message at the bottom right. I can also go to Monitor this virtual machine, and under Events and Tasks, I can see kind of what's been going on with this particular VM. And the error messages with VSphere are usually very descriptive. And what this is telling me is that I failed to extend the swap file from zero to 512 megabytes. What this is essentially telling me is that I don't have enough space on my data store. Part of this virtual machine requirement is going to be that it needs space on the datastore to create a swap file. I don't have the space for that. So therefore, this virtual machine cannot be created. Now, I can get around that by editing some of the settings on this virtual machine and reducing the amount of memory. The amount of swap space that's actually created depends entirely on the amount of memory that you grant this virtual machine. So I'm going to reduce the size of the memory requirement. I can't change the size of the virtual disc now. And now that my virtual machine has been reconfigured, let's try to launch it just one more time and see what happens. And again, under Monitor, I can watch my tasks for this VM. And I can see in this case that the virtual machine power operation was actually successful.

5. vMotion Types

In this video, I'll explain the basic concepts of Vmotion and how it can be used to take a running virtual machine and move it from one ESXi host to another. And that's the purpose of Vmotion. We have virtual machines that are running on one ESXi host, and maybe we need to do some sort of physical maintenance on that host, like add more memory. Or maybe we need to balance the load balance.For example, maybe one of our ESXi hosts is very heavily utilized, and we want to take some running virtual machines and move them off that heavily utilised host to a host that has fewer virtual machines on it. That's what we use V Motion for: to take a running VM and move it from one physical ESXi host to another with no service outage. So let's take a look at how Vmotion works. And in this example, we see a virtual machine in purple running on ESXi host one. And this is where the live state of our virtual machine is running. So maybe we need to take down host one for a memory upgrade, and we want to move our virtual machine to another host using Vmotion. This virtual machine also has a set of files that we see on the right-hand side of our data store. And so if we're going to take this virtual machine and move it to a different ESXi host, it must still be able to access those files. We cannot have our virtual machine lose access to its files because one of those files is a VMDK, and that VMDK is my virtual machine's C drive or one of its virtual disks. So it's imperative that if a VM is going to move from one host to another that it is still able to access all of its files on the data store. And so to do that, we're going to need what's called shared storage. And when you hear that term "shared storage," just think of it this way. Shared storage is a data store that is accessible across multiple ESXi hosts. So we've got this data store that's available on multiple hosts. And so if my VM moves from host one to host two, it's still going to be able to access all of its files. So here we go. My virtual machine has just moved from host one to host two. It still has access to its datastore because the data store is shared storage and is accessible across multiple hosts. And notice on the left-hand side that the virtual machine is connected to a virtual switch. And those virtual switches are also identically configured so that my VM does not lose access to the network when it moves. The IP address of the virtual machine does not change. So that address still needs to provide connectivity when that vehicle moves to another host. Now, this is a very basic look at some of the prerequisites for Vmotion. If you want to learn more details on this, check out my V Sphere Foundation course, which should be coming out shortly after this course is released. Okay, so let's take a look at an example of what actually happens when we carry out a VMotion. So again, my VM is running on hostESXi 1, and we've configured something called an aVM kernel port for V motion. The point of a VM kernelport is to handle special traffic. It's not for virtual machine traffic, it's for other stuff. So the VM kernel port in this case is marked for V motion traffic. And what it's going to do is facilitate a creation ofa copy of that virtual machine on the destination host. So let's rewind here. My virtual machine is running on ESXi host one right now. It's got stuff running in memory. It's accessing a virtual network interface. It's accessing storage. We need to copy the state of that VM to the destination host. And that's the point of the V motion VM kernel port. And once that copy is complete, now I've got an exact duplicate of that VM running on the destination host. As a result, any final changes will occur. Anything that changed during the V motion will also be copied over, and the VM on host one will be halted and the VM on host two will take over. And now we've successfully moved the virtual machine from host one to host two. And like I said, there's no outage associated with this. We do need to have V-Cento in place, and you may notice a slight bump in latency while this V motion occurs. But again, there's no noticeable outage. So Vmotion is used to take a running virtual machine and move it from one host to another. This is not the only type of V motion. With VSphere 6, we can actually take a virtual machine that's running on a host managed by one V Center instance and move it to a host managed by another V Center instance. So prior to VS 4/6, this was not possible. Now we can use cross-V centre V motion to move a running VM from one host managed by one V centre server to another host managed by a different V centre server. Another change in VSPh is the fact that long-distance V motion is now supported over connections with up to 150 milliseconds of latency. This is an important thing to remember forthe VMware certified associate exam is that wehave this ability to take a virtual machinethat's running V motion it with no serviceinterruption across a long geographic distance. As long as that physical connection does not have more than 150 milliseconds of latency, we can even migrate virtual machines from one virtual switch to another using cross-network V motion. And so in this lesson, we learned how V-Motion can be used to take a running VM and move it from one host to another, and how we need a V.Motion VM kernel port in order to copy the required information. Vspher.Six introduced a number of new V.Motion features, like cross-Vcenter V.Motion, cross-virtual switch V.Motion, and long-distance V.Motion.

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