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LPI 010-160 Premium Bundle

010-160 Premium File: 80 Questions & Answers

Last Update: Oct 14, 2022

010-160 Training Course: 78 Video Lectures

010-160 PDF Study Guide: 364 Pages

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LPI 010-160 Practice Test Questions, Exam Dumps

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Open Source Applications

1. What is Open Source?

Let's talk about open source software. What exactly is it? Well, open source software is software that is released under a licence in which the copyright holder grants users the right to study it, change it, and distribute it to anyone for any purpose. As such, the source code—the human-readable core of the software—is actually available for inspection, modification, and enhancement. Open source software is usually developed in collaboration and in a public manner. And it's a good example of how open collaboration can be used to create some great products and services. In the early days of computing, programmers and developers shared software in order to learn from each other and evolve in the field of computing. Eventually, the open source notion moved to the wayside as commercialization and software took over in the 1970s and 1980s. During this time and until today, academics and some developers still develop software collaboratively, though under an open source model. Now, because of this collaboration, software developers may want to publish their software with an open-source license, such as the GNU General Public License, or GPL, so anybody can develop the same software or understand its internal functioning. Now, scholars have pointed out several policy-based reasons for adopting open source software, including the heightened value proposition of going to an open source model. This is compared to most proprietary formats, especially in terms of security, affordability, transparency, interoperability, scalability, and localization. The Open Source Initiative is a public-benefit corporation that promotes the usage of open-source software. And they actually published a definition called the OpenSource Definition, or OSD. Now, the OSD is a document that determines whether a software licence can actually be labelled with the Open Source Certification mark. This mark serves as a distinctive label to show the attributes of a particular piece of software and how it complies with a general philosophy of open source.

2. Cost of Open Source

So how much does open source software cost? Well, this is a tricky question to answerbecause open source software is generally freely availablefor downloading and therefore the cost to acquireit is very low or free. But like any software project, whether it's open source or proprietary, there are other costs you have to consider that can start adding up, like technical support, training, administration, or maintenance. Now, in the early days of computing, almost all software was produced by academics and corporate researchers who were collaborating together. They often shared software as "public domain." This meant that there was absolutely no ownership and no copyright, trademark, or patent. As such, software is generally distributed under the principles of openness and cooperation. It was not seen as a commodity that could be bought or sold for profit. This communal behaviour later became a central element in the so-called hacking culture. Now, in this term, hacking is actually a positive thing among open-source programmers, not the hackers you see in movies today. At this time, the source code, the human-readable form of that software, was generally distributed with the software's machine code. So you had the compiled version that was machine code and the text-based version that a human could read. Users frequently needed to modify the software themselves because it wouldn't run on different hardware or different operating systems without that modification. And they also were able to add new features and fix bugs in the code all by themselves. Now, long after the advent of computers, industry has started adopting the power of computing and advancing its technologies even further. As such, new hardware and software needed to be developed to meet this increasing demand. Now, this had a large cost to produce this software, and the growing software industry had to start competing with the hardware manufacturers because the hardware manufacturers were already bundling software with the hardware to increase revenues and keep up with the rising costs. In software development, a general trend started to occur where we no longer distributed source code openly, but instead we made it proprietary. One would need to acquire a licence in order to use the software legally and be able to get a copy of it for your system. However, there has been a resurgence in research and alternatives to lower the costs of using and maintaining computer systems. Once again, by resurrecting this idea of free open-source software, open-source software developers now had to look for ways to continue developing the software while allowing it to remain free. Some of these developers resorted to private funding, crowdfunding, or even accepting donations to keep their projects alive. Now, these donations were completely voluntary, and this allowed users to still download the software even if they didn't donate to the software.Some have even gone so far as to commercialise their software, which means forming alliances with other companies to display advertisements or install other software within their open source software. This allows them to fund their software development while still allowing end users to freely use their software. So you can see, there's always going to be somebody who has to pay for the software because it takes a lot of time and effort to build that software. Whether it's someone like Microsoft selling you a licence for a proprietary piece of commercial software or something like Linux, which is free and open and easily distributed, but you may have to pay for support or custom coding to be made for it, There's always going to be some kind of cost that you have to consider when you adopt the software.

3. Desktop and Server Apps

In this lesson, I'm going to show you some desktop and server applications. The first one is going to be Libre Office. Now the first part of that is that we're going to use Libre Writer. Libre Writer is the equivalent of Microsoft Word. This is a word processor that will allow you to type up notes, reports, or anything else you need and then format it for your use. The next programme we're going to use is the spreadsheet program, and this is known as Libre Calc. Now, LibreCalc works just like Microsoft Excel. So if you're used to using that programme, this works extremely similarly to it. If you're on a Mac system, this would be like using numbers. The next programme we have is Libre Office Impress, which works like PowerPoint or Keynote. Next, let's open up a media player. We'll click on the Applications bar and type in VLC. VLC is a great media player that works across all operating systems. And so if you want to play a video on your Linux system, you can go ahead and simply open it in VLC. VLC can play pretty much any kind of audio or video file that you're going to throw at it, and it works really well. Next I'm going to show you a programme known as GIMP. GIMP is an image manipulation program, and it works like Adobe Photoshop. If you're a graphic designer, this is an excellent program. It works on Linux, Mac, or Windows. And it works very similarly to the way Photoshop works, including down to the filters. If you're used to using Photoshop, this is a great free alternative, and it works wonderfully on any Linux operating system. Next, we're going to use KD and LIVE. Katie and Live is a great video- and audio-editing program. So if you're trying to find something that will work like Adobe Premiere or Final Cut Pro, this is a good open source alternative. There are many other ones out there, like Open Shot, that also work great. Now, if you're just doing audio, probably the best audio editor out there is known as Audacity. Audacity is a free open-source, cross-platform tool that works on Linux, Windows, and Mac. If you're going to do something like create a podcast or an audiobook, or if you're in a band and you want to make your own CDs, Audacity is a great editor that will allow you to really get in depth with your music and your audio and clean it up and make it sound wonderful. Of course, we've already talked about web browsers, and of course you do have Firefox. You can also get Google Chrome, Opera, and many other browsers, depending on which one you like the best. So now that we've covered all these different desktop applications, let's talk about server applications. And these are going to be applications that you're going to use if you're a server administrator or a network administrator. The first one is Wireshark. Wireshark is a protocol analyzer. It allows you to connect your server to the network, turn on Wireshark, and capture all of the network traffic that's going across. This way, you can analyse it and figure out what's working and what's not. If you take my Network+ course, you'll learn about Wireshark there. Next we're going to talk about GParted. Now, GParted is a disc partition management tool, and this is a graphical user interface for one. Now, in GParted, you can see here that there is only a single hard drive in the system, which is the ten gigabyte virtual hard drive we've created. Now, if I wanted to shrink this down or expand it to a larger size, I can do that within GParted, and I can also add additional hard discs and format them from here. Next, we're going to look at timeshift. Now, Timeshift is a backup tool. It works very much like TimeMachine inside a Mac computer. It allows you to set up different times and backups for your system. And you can create restore points and then restore from them. This will allow you to go backwards or forwards in time using those snapshots. And so if you deleted a file or you broke your system, you can actually restore it to an earlier time period and be able to bring that system back to life. Again. This works like Time Machine inside of a Mac or like System Restore inside of a Windows machine. The next one we're going to talk about is Atom, and Adam is a text editor. Atom will allow you to create text documents, or if you're doing scripting or programming, this can be a very helpful tool for you if you're used to notepad or text editing or something like that. Atom is very much like that. Now, the great thing about Adam is that when you start doing things like coding and scripting in this way, it works very much like TextWrangler on a Windows or Mac system. and the last one we have is known as Putty. PuTTY is a terminal client. It's very useful when you're connecting over SSH to a remote server. Putty also works on Windows machines. And so if you're an assistant administrator on a Windows machine, you may be used to using Putty as well. Again, the specific use of all these tools is beyond the scope of this course. What we really want you to remember is that there is a tool for pretty much anything you can do on Windows or Mac within Linux. So if you're used to using Adobe Premiere on your Windows machine, you can go ahead and do something like Katie on Live. If you're used to using Photoshop on your Mac, you can go ahead and use something like GIMP here on Linux. All of these are great tools that you're going to be able to learn and play with as you go forward in the open source movement.

4. Languages and Tools

One of the great things about Linux is its embedded support for different programming languages. So in this lesson, I'm going to give you a quick introduction to ten of those programming languages and the tools we can use to write, read, and execute those programs. First, let's look at JavaScript. So JavaScript is simply a text file that ends in ".js." This can be embedded within HTML or be its own file. The first thing we're going to look at is "hello, dot HTML." If I open up my terminal, you can see here when I use G Edit that I can display the contents of that file. Hello, HTML. As you can see here, there are only three lines that make up the JavaScript. The first line shows I'm going to give you a JavaScript program. The second line says, "Document: Write Hello World to Your Screen." and the last line to close out this JavaScript program. Now, if I go ahead and open up this hello.html file, you'll see displayed on your screen, "hello world." Now that's a very simple JavaScript program, but we can make it a little bit more complex. And to do that, we would separate it into its own JavaScript file. Let's take a look at a more complex JavaScript program. And this one is going to be a to-do list. Now this one has been broken out into the index HTML, which holds the main website, and the JavaScript JS, which holds all of the code that allows this to-do list to work. Let's take a look at the JavaScript code. In this case, if I use G Edit and then scriptJS, you'll see it load to the screen, and you'll see that this is a much more complicated programme than the three lines—hello, world—that we did in the last example. Now to call that script JS file, we're going to do that from within the main website's index HTML. You can see here that we have that script command there, which is an asynchronous script for script JS. That is the single call to the file we just looked at. Now if I double-click index HTML, you're going to see the to-do list program. Here you can enter a new item, click on the button, and it will be added to your list. As you keep adding new items, you're going to enter the quantity, click the button, and it will add to your list. If you're done with it, you can close it, and those will come off your list. Again, this is a really simple program, but you can see the power of JavaScript here at work. Next, I'm going to show you Python, which is a great scripting and interpretive language. Now, there are two ways to write Python code. You can do it in an interpretive environment, or you can create it inside of a text file, as you see here on your screen. Let's go ahead and look at the interpreted version. First we're going to open up our terminal. We'll enter Python 3, since we're using version three of Python, and hit Enter. Now we are in the interactive environment, and so we can issue direct Python commands. One of the easiest commands is the print command. Print will display whatever's inside the quotes on your screen. So we're going to use Print quote. Hello World, end quote, and hit Enter. And it will appear on your screen. Now, if we want to do this from a script, we can do that as well. So let's open up G Edit and look at our script for Hello World. From here, you can see I have the exact same command just saved as a text file. So if I go ahead and close that, we can run that file simply by doing Python 3. And the name of the file is, in this case, Helloworld PY. When you hit Enter, what happens? You get Hello World displayed on your screen. Again, this is a very simple Python program, but again, it shows you how it's built in natively to Linux. The next language we're going to look at is PHP. PHP is heavily used by web servers, and because of this, it's heavily used inside of Linux because Linux is heavily used for web servers. Now, PHP is another programme like JavaScript that will work with HTML files. So if we open up index.php here, you can see we have an opening bracket that says this is a PHP script. We have the one-line script, which is echoing "Hello World" to the screen or displaying it to the screen, and then the closing bracket with that question mark and greater than sign. So if we open up a Firefox web browser and we go to the local host IP of this machine, we can then open up that index PHP file and have it run on our web server. And in this case, you can see HelloWorld on our screen. The next language we're going to look at is Java. And Java is a great language because it works on lots of different operating systems. In fact, if you're using an Android phone, all the applications are written in Java. Now, Java is a compiled language, though, so when you look at code like this, where you have the hello class, you see the code that we're putting together to be able to display Hello World on our screen. This is just text, and the computer doesn't understand it. It needs to convert this text into an executable binary. And so to do that, we have to open up our terminal. When we open up our terminal, we're going to use the Java compiler, which is Java C, and then the name of the text file that we just wrote our code in, in this case, Hello Java, Java. Now, once we hit Enter and we compile that code, we now have an executable Java file. Now that we've compiled it, we have a class known as the Hello class. To run that, we'll type Javaspace's hello class and hit Enter. That will execute the hello class object, and that will display Hello World on the screen. As you can see, Java is a little bit more complicated, but it is extremely powerful, and you can write full-fledged programmes that will run on any operating system using Java. The next thing we're going to talk about is CSS, and you may hear these called style sheets. These are used with HTML pages, and they describe the contents and how things should be displayed within that HTML page. So, if we open up this style.css sheet, we can see how the body should look, what colour the background should be, what type of font it should use, how big the thing should be, what kind of margins it should have, and whether things should be bold or italicized. All of that information is described here in the style sheet. And this gives us a very easy way to change the entire look and feel of a web page by simply modifying the style sheet instead of having to go back and do it throughout the entire HTML document. So if you want to see what this looks like, we'll open up index HTML, and here you can see what the background colour is, what things are bolded, and things like that based on our style sheet. So now that I've shown you the stylesheet, let's look at how you would reference this from your index.dot HTML document. We'll open that up using G Edit again, and inside of here we can see that single lineup there near the top; it says Link Rail, Style Sheet, Media, all href equals, and style CSS. Again, you can plug in and play different style sheets and completely change the look and feel of your website. just changing this one line. The next language we're going to talk about is C, and like Java, it's a compiled language. So you can see here that I have "Hello World dot CPP." If I open it up inside the text editor, you're going to be able to see what the code looks like. Again, this is more complex than something like Python because it is considered a lower-level programming language. Now here you'll see we have some include statements, we have a main function, and in there we have this Hello World that we want to display to the screen. Like I said, it's a little bit more complicated. Now, if we want to run this program, we do have to compile it just like we did in Java. Now to compile the Hello World dot CPP file, we're going to use a programme known as G Plus. G Plus Plus is a compiler for the C programming language. So we're going to use GPlusPlusO, which says this is the output file. We'll call that file hello, which will become our binary, and then the source file Helloworld CPP. Once we hit Enter, we now have a file called hello. To run that executable file, we'll type "hello" and hit Enter. And now we finally get the Hello, World" onto our screen. Like I said, it's a little bit more complicated, right? The next language we're going to look at is Go, and Go is a newer object-oriented programming language. Go, just like Java, and just like C, does need to be compiled. So here you see I have a text file called "Hello, Go." If I open that up, you can see what the source code looks like. You can see it's not nearly as complicated as Java or C, but it is more complicated than something like Python. Now, to compile it, we're going to go into our terminal, and we're going to use the compiler for Go. First, we have to create a file for it to go into. And so we'll do this by typing "Touch" and then the file name "Hello Go." After we do that, we're going to type Go Build, which is going to build that file into the code we need to run. And then to execute it, we're going to use Go. And that will execute the programme and Hello World" on the screen. Go is a really popular programming language these days, and it is one that you may want to look into if you decide to become a developer. The next one we're going to talk about is C, and C is a low-level programming language. The C that we talked about earlier is actually an evolution of C. So first, let's open up the C source code. You can see that it's not as clean or as nice as something like Python or Go, but it's still fairly easy to read. Next, we need to compile it, so we'll open up our terminal. Next, in GCC, enter the name of the file helloworld, C, and then specify our output file of hello. After we do that, we can now execute the hello-compiled binary by doing hello and outcomes. Helloworld. As you can see, this works very similarly to C, a newer object-oriented version of the C programming language. In addition to C and C, there's also C. Sharp. Now, C is going to be started from within a development environment. In this case, I'm going to use monondevelop. So because this is a development environment,you have to select some presets. In this case, I'm going to use a console and I'm going to give it the name "Hello World" for my project. Once I create that, I'm going to have a text-based output that I can use to create my files. From. Here, I've pasted in the code I'm going to use. Again, not as clean as something like Python or Go, but it's still fairly readable. Now again, this is a compiled language. So we'll have to go up to build and build the project, and then we can go to run and run the project. And here we can now see HelloWorld is out to our screen. And then we can press any key to continue and close out this window. The last language we're going to look at is Ruby, which is very popular in Web development. Now, again, I'm going to do a very simple example by showing you Hello World. And you'll notice that it is HelloWorld RB, which is a Ruby file. Now, this is like Python in that it can be an interpretive language or it can be executed from a script language. First, I'm going to show you an interpretive language by going into my terminal. From the terminal, we're going to go ahead and type in the command we want to execute to display Hello World on our screen. We're going to go into IRB, which is the interactive Ruby environment. And then we're going to type in the commandlets "Hello World," end quote," and "hit enter." This is going to put Hello World on the display of the terminal. Once we hit enter, boom. We have Hello World displayed on our screen. And now we're back at the interpretive prompt. Now, if we want to do this as a script, let me show you what the script looks like. As you can see, it's just a simple text file with the exact same command I just used in the interactive environment. So if I want to execute that, I'm going to type in Ruby and then HelloWorldRB at the command prompt and hit Enter. This says "execute this file using the Ruby interpreter." And, as you can see, HelloWorld returns to the screen. Now, in this lesson, I showed you ten different programming languages, and I showed you pretty much the same example in all of them: how to display Hello World on the screen. The point of this video is for you to understand that there are lots of different development languages out there. I only showed you ten of them because those are the ten that are on the objectives for the exam. But there are many, many more. In fact, there are hundreds of different languages that come included in your Linux distribution. Now, for the exam, you just need to understand that there are lots of different languages and you can have a great development environment by

5. Package Installs and Repositories

Now, let's talk about how we install software on Linux using package managers and software repositories. There is a wide variety of Linux distributions, and, because of this, there is also a wide variety of package managers. Each Linux distribution compiles its own software with its desired library versions and compilation options. Options for Linux applications generally won't run on every distribution. Instead, they're specific to the distribution you're using. Even if they could run every distribution, installation would be hindered by competing package formats and availability. If you locate a Linux application website, for example, you're likely going to see a variety of different download links for the different package formats and Linux distributions. Otherwise, if none is available for that specific distro, you're going to be informed to download the source code yourself and then compile it for your distribution. Now, unlike Windows users, Linux users normally won't download and install applications from different application websites. Instead, each Linux distribution hosts its own software repository. These repositories contain software packages specifically compiled for your version of Linux and its distro. For example, if you're using Ubuntu 12.4, the repositories you use will contain packages specifically compiled for Ubuntu 12.4, not for the latest version like 18 Four.Now, package managers will automatically download the appropriate packages from their configured software repository, then install them, configure them, and set them up for you. This is in contrast to installing software in a Windows or a Mac environment, where you have to click through a wizard or locate executable files on a certain website. When an update is released, your package manager will actually notice that and download the appropriate update as well. On Windows or Mac, each application has its own way to receive automatic updates. But in Linux, the package manager handles updates for every piece of installed software, as long as they were installed from within the software repository originally. Now, while Windows uses executable files known as "exe" and macOS uses DMG or "app" files for their installation, Linux has many different package formats. These packages are essentially the archives contain thelist of files that are needed for installation. The package manager will open up the archive and then install the files in the location that the package specifies. This package manager will remain aware of all the files that belong to each of the packages, and packages can also contain scripts that will run when the package is installed or removed. Some of our popular package formats within Linux are DED, RPM, and TAR files. Now, a dev file gets its name from Debian, and it's also used by Debian-based distros like Ubuntu. RPM originally stood for the Red Hat package manager, and it was used by RedHat, but now it's also used by Fedora and OpenSUSE. A tar package or tar file can end in a ta, r, TGZ, or tar GZ, and this is sometimes considered our universal package format. These are used by distributions like Slackware and Arch Linux. Now, while your Linux distribution ships with its own repositories that are preconfigured, you can also add other repositories to your system if you want. You can then install software from those repositories and receive updates for that software as well. For example, Ubuntu offers a wide variety of personal package archives, or PPAs. These contain software that is compiled by individual users and teams that has newer features that aren't in the official distributions. When it comes time to install new software on Linux, it's a little bit different than what you're used to on a Windows or a Mac machine. So for example, on a Windows machine, you might be familiar with going to something like the Windows Store, and from here you can search and figure out whatever game it is you want or whatever programme you want, and you'd be able to click on it and install it that way. Another way you'd install something is by going to the website of the software you want. For example, if you wanted to install VirtualBox like you did earlier in this course, you'd go to virtualbox.org, click on the download button, and then go to Windows Host and click on that. When you do that, you get a file known as an exe file. This is an executable file, and so if we open up this file, we can see it inside of our folder. We have this program, and we simply double-click it, and that will open it up and walk us through an installation programme that will install the piece of software onto our Windows machine. Now, on a Linux machine, it's a little bit different, and the reason is that every distribution has its own way of installing software. If you're using a distribution like Ubuntu, like I recommended, you have a really good appstore known as the Ubuntu Software Store. If you click on that, you'll be able to find whatever programmes you want, and you'll be able to install them. For example, let's say you're a music fan and you want to listen to Spotify. Well, just click on the magnifying glass, enter in Spotify, and hit Enter, and it will search and find Spotify for you. You can click on that, click on the Install button, and very simply, you're going to end up having your programme installed just like you'd want. This works very similar to something that you're used to on an iPhone or an Android device, in fact, because it's a very easy-to-use one-stop shop for installing software. Now the challenge is that if you're going to be installing a piece of software that doesn't exist within this software repository, or the store in this case, you're going to have to go and find those pieces of software and find the right one for your distribution. Let's go back and take a look at VirtualBox one more time. So if we go to virtualbox.org and we go back to the download area, you're going to notice that you have the Windows host, the OSX host, and the Linux distributions. Now, if I click on Linux distributions, we now have to figure out which version of Linux we're using so we can install that piece of software. Now, just because I'm using Ubuntu doesn't mean that I'm using the right Ubuntu. So I'm personally using 18.04 as my version of Ubuntu, so I'd have to download this file. But if you're using an older version, like 16 or 14, you'd have to use this one or this one. If you've chosen to use Debion, you'll use oneof these open source, one of these fedora, oneof these Oracle, one of these and if you'reusing anything else, you can use all distributions whereyou'll be able to download the source code andthen you'll have to compile it yourself. Now, that can be a lot of work. Now, if I'm going to use it for Ubuntu, though, I can simply click on here because I have one that is ready to go and prepackaged. Notice the file extension here is De B.This is a Debion package, which means that I can use the software installer, which understands this Debionfile format, to open it and then install that piece of software on my machine. In the next section of this course, we'll talk more about managing software packages and using things like the depths that I'm using here to be able to install a package, or using something like yum, pacman, tarballs, and all sorts of other things.

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  • stephanie
  • Iceland
  • Apr 06, 2020

the practice tests for LPI 010-160 exam never disappointed me. with their help, i was able to determine in which topics of the exam i was weak and so i studied them more thus gaining more knowledge. i am so grateful guys for helping me to pass the test!! will recommend your materials to my friends!

  • Apr 06, 2020
  • kendra
  • France
  • Apr 03, 2020

hi guys? is any of LPI 010-160 exam dumps offered in this website valid? have they helped anyone to pass the exam? need your advice, I have my exam soon…

  • Apr 03, 2020
  • rahul516
  • United States
  • Mar 27, 2020

hi! just wanted to tell you that these LPI 010-160 vce files are helpful. i passed my Linux Essentials Certificate exam five days ago using them. i can say confidently that all what you need to know about the exam has been covered in these files. try them and your preparation process will not only be easy but also effective. best of luck!

  • Mar 27, 2020
  • LINUX MAN
  • Peru
  • Jan 29, 2020

Hello, is the premium dump valid?, thank you

  • Jan 29, 2020
  • TARO
  • United States
  • Apr 11, 2019

Someone used this dump? Still Valid?

  • Apr 11, 2019

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