• Home
  • PMI
  • PMI-ACP PMI Agile Certified Practitioner Dumps

Pass Your PMI PMI-ACP Exam Easy!

100% Real PMI PMI-ACP Exam Questions & Answers, Accurate & Verified By IT Experts

Instant Download, Free Fast Updates, 99.6% Pass Rate

PMI-ACP Premium Bundle

$79.99

PMI PMI-ACP Premium Bundle

PMI-ACP Premium File: 204 Questions & Answers

Last Update: Jan 24, 2023

PMI-ACP Training Course: 68 Video Lectures

PMI-ACP PDF Study Guide: 587 Pages

PMI-ACP Bundle gives you unlimited access to "PMI-ACP" files. However, this does not replace the need for a .vce exam simulator. To download VCE exam simulator click here
PMI PMI-ACP Premium Bundle
PMI PMI-ACP Premium Bundle

PMI-ACP Premium File: 204 Questions & Answers

Last Update: Jan 24, 2023

PMI-ACP Training Course: 68 Video Lectures

PMI-ACP PDF Study Guide: 587 Pages

$79.99

PMI-ACP Bundle gives you unlimited access to "PMI-ACP" files. However, this does not replace the need for a .vce exam simulator. To download your .vce exam simulator click here

PMI PMI-ACP Exam Screenshots

PMI PMI-ACP Practice Test Questions in VCE Format

File Votes Size Date
File
PMI.examquestions.PMI-ACP.v2022-12-05.by.jamie.418q.vce
Votes
1
Size
883.38 KB
Date
Dec 05, 2022
File
PMI.practiceexam.PMI-ACP.v2021-04-27.by.hunter.394q.vce
Votes
1
Size
634.51 KB
Date
Apr 28, 2021
File
PMI.pass4sures.PMI-ACP.v2020-05-14.by.alice.324q.vce
Votes
2
Size
752.3 KB
Date
May 14, 2020

PMI PMI-ACP Practice Test Questions, Exam Dumps

PMI PMI-ACP PMI Agile Certified Practitioner exam dumps vce, practice test questions, study guide & video training course to study and pass quickly and easily. PMI PMI-ACP PMI Agile Certified Practitioner exam dumps & practice test questions and answers. You need avanset vce exam simulator in order to study the PMI PMI-ACP certification exam dumps & PMI PMI-ACP practice test questions in vce format.

Agile Principles and Mindset

1. Agile Principles and Mindset Section Overview

In this section, we're going to talk about the Agile principles and the mindset, two key things that you really need to know for your exam. So we're going to address that throughout this whole section. So we'll talk about serving as an agile leader, which is the role of a servant leader. What does that mean? In this section, we're also going to discuss: Why even use Agile? Why is it beneficial for you or your organization? We're going to address all the different approaches to Agile that you might encounter on the PmiACP exam. We will also look at this concept or this document, called the Declaration of Interdependence. It's something unique to Agile. Now in this section, we're also going to look at one of the most important concepts. It's really what the remainder of the course is based on, and that's the Agile Manifesto. We're going to talk about individuals and interactions, working software, customer collaboration, and responding to change. So, there's a lot of information to discuss in this section, just dealing with the Agile Manifesto. Now, beyond those four items, there are twelve principles that we'll look at behind the Agile Manifesto. So for your PMI ACP exam, it's a good idea to be familiar with the manifesto and with these twelve principles. But you don't necessarily need to memorise these. It's more about having the mindset. So we'll look at that throughout this section. Now in this section, we're also going to talk an awful lot about management versus leadership. And what is your role as a project manager versus a servant leader? Management, as we know, is about getting things done, where leadership is about aligning and motivating people. I like to say that leadership is about getting people to want to do what needs to be done. And management is all about just getting things done. So we'll take a look at that in this section. Throughout the section, we'll also see a theme about communicating the vision, about creating a shared vision or a common vision, and how we communicate and reconvene around that vision. throughout the project. We will discuss some leadership tasks in this section about giving transparency through visualization, creating a safe environment for experimentation, experimenting with new techniques and processes, and sharing knowledge through collaboration. All right, a lot of information is to be discussed in this section. Let's hop in and knock it out right now.

2. PMI-ACP Domain Overview: Agile Principles and Mindset

This is a section all about the principles and mindsets of Agile. The overview of domain one for your PMI-ACP exam really important domain here. So, in this domain, the Agile principles and mindset apply to your tests. This is 16% of your exam content, right around 19 test questions. It's all about Agile fundamentals: values for Agile projects, agile principles and methodologies, and working as an Agile leader. And notice that word there about serving—that you're a servant leader. And so we'll talk more about that term in this section. Agile principles and mindset tasks This is right from the PMI's exam objectives: that you're an advocate for Agile principles and values and ensure a common understanding. So educating and influencing for Agile is part of communicating our understanding of Agile principles. Now here's a key exam tip right here. Transparency equals trust. So guarantee you'll see that concept that you don't try to hide a mistake, that you come forward and make mistakes, and that you're transparent if things are going well or not so well. And then you provide asafe environment for experimenting. So that is really important, and that makes our team feel confident. They don't feel like you're going to suffer repercussions for experimenting, so they're more likely to try new approaches. And that's what we want our team to do in Agile. Also here in Agile, these principles and tasksthat you experiment, as I was just mentioningyou shared knowledge and new collaboration. the idea of emergent leadership, where any individual can lead. It's not always the team lead or the project manager or the scrum master. And then you have to practise servant leadership. really important exam topic. And I guarantee you, you're going to see that concept over and over in this course using Agile. So why do we use Agile? Well. We'll talk about that in detail in this course and in this section of the advantages that Agile gives us. especially in software development. We'll look at the different types of projects that use different approaches, and then we're going to compare Agile to that predictive approach where we plan everything upfront like waterfall. Where we plan ahead of time and then, of course, What happens if there's a change lower in the waterfall? It really becomes more cumbersome to incorporate. That's where Agile is very reactive, and we expect and anticipate change. Like knowledge work, software development has many unknowns. You don't know what's going to happen. So Agile can respond more easily than a waterfall or even a cinnamon roll approach that some of us may be familiar with. On your exam, you won't need to know the concept of waterfall; just know agile and predictive. or predictive, as you're predicting what happens. like in construction. Construction is great for predictive. not saying one is better than the other; it's just saying that different types of projects should use different types of projects. Management. So Agile is better suited for knowledge work wherethere's more unknowns, where predictive is more for. We have known uncertainty, and we need known uncertainty for the type of work that we're doing in that project. Knowledge-based jobs are like software development; they're special; and as I was just mentioning, industrial jobs are like construction; they require upfront planning. We have to have blueprints and permitting and all sorts of schematics that are needed. We want that in industrial work. Knowledge work, though so manyunknowns, we expect change. Work involving knowledge is really invisible work. Agile is really suited for software development projects because it's knowledge work. So I believe you are aware of this because you are present. Let's take just a minute, and we're going to quickly compare and contrast industrial work and knowledge work. So industrial projects, compared to knowledge work like software development projects, involve visible and unvisible stability, lots of changes, running things, or changing environments. In the industrial sector, we have more or less structure. We have the correct answers to your questions. Task driven, value driven, commandand control, autonomy driven. Talk about the team. Autonomy standards like in construction: lots of standards Where knowledge work, we have innovation and thenwe have performance measurement, learning and teaching. Cost of workers for a task, workersare an asset, not a cost. So industrial versus knowledge work—you're not going to see a whole lot of that in the remainder of the course. I think that's pretty self evident.But just be familiar with the idea of predictive planning versus Agile. Now, within predictive planning and Agile, we also have this concept of defined processes versus empirical processes. For industrial work, we need those clearly defined processes. That's expected, that's what's needed, and that's what's proven to work well, where knowledge work relies on more empirical processes. Where we investigate, experiment, and do interactions and incremental approaches, we change and adapt. So empirical processes are more change-driven because it's about being creative and discovering, whereas defined processes are solid and rigid because that's what's needed and that's what's proven to work. Again, I'm not saying one is better than the other. The agile mindset is the thing that you'll see a lot of in this course and on your exam. So in terms of a mindset, we're all talking about the assumptions, the methods, and the approach that create the incentive to adapt or accept prior behaviors. So it's all about what you believe and your assumptions about those beliefs. So it's just a way of thinkingabout the things in the project. So several characteristics, positive attitude, agilemindset, we need a positive attitude. You want a thirst for knowledge; you want to know why and how to learn more. that we want our team to be successful. That's very evident throughout this course. We want to be pragmatic, not just always so optimistic that we're not realistic. We want to be pragmatic. We also have to have a willingness to fail. So these are all characteristics of the agile mindset. It's different for your exam. It's different than just recalling terms. You have to really think agile. So here are some themes I'd like you to consider in relation to that value. First, think about value. Every time you have an opportunity to improve or deliver value early or at all, that's probably a good inclination for an answer. The second thing is your team members. The team is most important. You support the team that you want to work with the team.So go in that direction, and then the agile mindset is to think and expect changes. I think you're going to see that it's going to happen a lot. All right, moving ahead with the declaration of interdependence, So here are some pointers and information about this interdependence. So we think about being agile within our team. These are some things to take along with you. We increase return on investment by making a continuous flow of value our focus. So again, value. We deliver reliable results by engaging customers in frequent interactions and shared ownership. We expect uncertainty and manage for it through iterations, anticipation, and adaptation. We unleash creativity and innovation by recognising that individuals are the ultimate source of value and creating an environment where they can make a difference. We boost performance through group accountability for results and shared responsibility for team effectiveness. We improve effectiveness and reliability throughsituationally specific strategies, processes and practices. Exam Tip: You must be agile. Not only do I know agile, I embrace empirical processes, creativity, and discovery, and I have the willingness to fail at knowledge. Work is invisible work, communicationand collaboration is paramount. Alright, good job. Let's keep moving forward.

3. Introducing the Agile Principles and Mindset

In this lecture, we're going to talk about one of the key principles for your PmiACP exam, which is to create an agile mindset. An agile mindset is a key to exam success. So let's hop in and look at these principles and talk about an agile mindset and what you'll likely see on your exam. The agile mindset is all about embracing and really becoming agile, so it's built on these agile core principles. A first principle is to welcome and expect change. In an agile project, change is welcome and even expected. Change happens. Now, in a predictive project management approach like building a house, that change is generally frowned upon up front. We want to identify all of the requirements and have those documented and agreed upon before we begin the work. But once we begin the work, we become very pessimistic about change. That's not true in an agile environment. In Agile, we expect change to happen, so we welcome change into the project. So on your exam, I want to take a very positive approach when change could be introduced and say that change is welcome. It's what we expect to happen in Agile doesn'tmean the change is always going to be easyor the change is going to be simple toincorporate into the work that we've done. But it's part of the agile mindset: yes, you can change the scope. We welcome and expect change in Agile. The next point here is to create small value-added increments. In software development, we do incremental deliverables. So these incremental deliverables or incremental releases are small chunks of the vision that the customer has or the product owner has for the end of the project. So the small value-added increments don't mean we release them to everyone that's going to use them. But we might have a test area or kind of sandbox to do these releases in where we can show we're making progress towards the complete piece of software. Now we could do it in increments where our release is published and usable to some extent. So you can imagine a big web project where maybe small value-added increments would be published to the website, and there would be functionality with each one of those. In Agile, we focus on the highest priority items first. When we do these value-added increments, we are taking the most important, highest priority components of the project and publishing them first. And then we go back to the next iteration, and everything moves up in our queue unless we can do some grooming and rearranging or whatever the case may be. But the next chunk of user stories or requirements that are in our queue is what we attack next, and then those go into the next increments, so that every increment we're delivering is directly tied to the most important, the top priority items. And that gives priority based on what the customers asked for, based on what the product owner says, and that adds value. Utilize feedback loops. This is an agile mindset in which you want to speak with your team, but your team may also speak with you, and you speak with your product owner, your team speaks to the product owner, and the customers and stakeholders talk to one another. You embrace that. Communication is so key and agile, and it's not always focused on the project manager. You constantly learn through discovery and creativity. This goes back to that exam topic that we looked at in the last section, where we want to create a safe environment where people can experiment for better ways of doing their work. And if you fail, you being the project team, you're not punished for that; you've learned something that didn't work. So you constantly learn through discovery and creativity, and you should feel free and empowered to be able to do that. You're going to see that on your exam. The primary goal of agile is to create value for stakeholders. And how do we do that? I've already described the focus on developing a value by focusing on what the user stories are in the queue, what's the queue for the project, and what's the queue for the current sprint or iteration. And that all reflects what the customer values based on how they prioritise those requirements or user stories. As I mentioned a moment ago, it's okay to fail. We just want to fail fast. What failing fast means is that we experiment, and we look to see if that experiment is going to work. If it doesn't work, we've learned from that failure, and we can adapt and move on. Failing fast is good rather than failing slowly because the slowfail is like in a predictive environment where you have atriangular risk that you get all the way to a pointlike a cut over in an operating system. to discover the risk is going to cause the project to fail. Failing fast and agilely allows us to fail early or quickly and to learn what works or does not work. And then we can adapt and move forward again. Deliver value throughout the project. So you want to give value to your customers, to your stakeholders, and to the product owner, but you also want to give value to the team by demonstrating that you appreciate and value their knowledge and their ability to create and constantly improve upon the project and the project work. So you do this with the product owner and the team. This is the prioritisation of the requirements and the user's Stories is also the ability to make recommendations to the product owner about what should be added, removed, or reprioritized and to give some guidance. And this may not always be the project manager's role. Perhaps someone on the development team can make those recommendations as they're working with the product owner on grooming the backlog, which is really important for your exam and being agile versus doing agile. For your exam, you want to be agile; you want to possess an agile mindset; you want to choose correct practices; you want to implement correct practices; and you'll tailor agile processes. Now, this means that you tailor and adapt processes that work well in your environment. A little word here, a little warning. If you're brand new to agile, in a test question, let's say you have a project manager who's new to agile and your team wants to begin tailoring the processes first; you want to learn the processes before you begin tailoring them. You're allowed to tailor agile processes. It's not rigid, it's fluid. Now doing agile is what we want to shy away from; you're just doing the job without really embracing agile. that you're forcing the agile practice, that you're taking a command and control position, and that you want to understand agile, not embrace agile. So those are things that you really don't want to do. You want to be rather than do. So being agile is what you want to have—that mindset and that approach, especially on your exam. Three points here about influencing organisational agility First off, an individual with an agile mindset will feel frustrated if the remainder of the organisation doesn't embrace agile. So imagine that you're an agile project manager, you earn your PMI-CP, and then you go in and take a job somewhere, and your sponsor of a new project says, "Oh, we've heard about agile, but we really don't use that here." We are going to feel kind of frustrated. This is something you've embraced and you believe in, and they're not going to do Agile. So you're going to feel some frustration in that scenario. A single team using Agile may feel isolated if the rest of the organisation doesn't understand Agile practices. So as a single team, they're working in agile and they're grooving along, but the stakeholders don't subscribe to it, the product owner doesn't get it, and your customers don't understand what you're doing. So there's going to besome frustration within that team. So they're going to feel kind of isolated, and they're the odd birds over here using Agile. And then finally, an entire organisation adapting to agility helps everyone work together to improve organisational agility. So basically, you really win with Agile when the whole organisation does it. What's the reality of that? It probably depends on the size of your organization, but that's important for your exam: that the project manager is educating others about agile and influencing others to use agile at an organization-wide level. So pay attention to those three things for your exam, just to carry that point out just a little bit further about creating organisational agility. As an individual, think about and embrace agile as an individual.So you begin with yourself then doing andunderstanding agile will help us to begin toinfluence others to embrace agile, influence others toembrace agile through education and demonstration. So that's how you communicate it. And to some extent, how you sell Agile is by practising it yourself and showing how it can work. So you have to demonstrate it and educate others. That's a key example. We're going to talk about the inverted triangle model. Now in traditional project management, we have the idea of the triple constraints: time, cost, and scope. And this is an equilateral triangle, where each side of the triangle is of the same length. So, based on the scope that the customer gives to you, I want you to build this house for me. So, based on the scope—this house and all of these requirements—here's how long it will take and how much it will cost. So the scope is fixed in the triple constraints, and the time and the cost are relative to the scope. So if the customer adds new requirements—if they add a swimming pool to the house project—well, the scope has gotten bigger. So then the time and the cost reflect that. But generally the scope is what's fixed, and time and cost reflect the scope. Now in Agile, it's inverted so that we have a fixed time and fixed cost, and the scope is what varies. Let's talk about that. If a customer says, I need this software delivered by January 1 and I have $450,000 to do and here's what I want the software to do," don't they still have to balance? They do. They absolutely do. But the time and the cost are what we work toward. So we do that first of all examining what's inthe scope and we break that scope down and wehave that list of requirements and we prioritise with thecustomer, with the product owner that list of requirements. So, based on that list of requirements and what has been prioritized, we draw a line that separates what we can do with this much money and time for this much scope. So, if your time and costs are fixed, as they frequently are in software development, what varies is the scope. Now this also tells us that scope can change because we have that list of requirements, and the customer can change their priorities throughout the project. That might change the scope as well. Well, what if the customer adds some requirements that are going to take more time and more money? Well, then there are other requirements on that list that get bumped from what's feasible. So the time and cost are fixed in the Agile triangle of constraints. A little exam tip for you: don't cram for the PMI ACP exam. It won't do any good. As you go through this course and study your notes and the different resources you may have, think of yourself as trying to become an agile project manager. So embrace the mindset of being agile. Don't think about passing the exam. I know that's your goal, but I want you to think about becoming an agile PM. So many of the exam questions are going to be from a leader's perspective. So, understand agile from the perspective of a leader, including how to implement agile, lead agile, and educate and influence others to embrace and use agile. So that's really the big tip from this lecture—to embrace the modern mindset of agility.

4. Walking through the Agile Manifesto

The Agile Manifesto is a document that was created by the Agile Alliance. It's a very simple document that defines the beliefs and principles behind Agile. Now we're going to walk through the Agile Manifesto in the next lecture or two. But you want to embrace these concepts. But you don't need to memorise these concepts. They're very easy to grasp. So I have the mindset behind these and understand them. I would encourage you to read the Agile Manifesto. If you just Google it, you'll find it. Or you can look at these slides because they are the Agile Manifesto, just kind of broken down for you. So let's start by talking about the four values of the Agile Manifesto. And really, these four values It is the Agile Manifesto. That's it. individuals and interactions over processes and tools. working software over comprehensive documentation. customer collaboration over contract negotiation. Responding to change by sticking to a plan So the things in bold are the things that we want to embrace. The things that are important from theAgile Manager's point of view, from anyoneinvolved in Agile's point of view. So individuals and interactions, working software, customer collaboration responding to change. So embrace those and know them for your exam. Now let's talk about these injustices in a little bit more detail. individuals and interactions over processes and tools. Individuals and interactions are the most important items in the Agile Manifesto. Processes and tools will be needed on projects. Projects are completed by people, not processes and tools. Agile projects are as much about people as they are about detailed processes. Sophisticated tools were developed. The focus really shifted from the people that were doing the work to all the tools and the processes that we fell in love with. tools and processes. So vendors would come and they would sell some solution—a process or a tool—and then we would embrace it. That would be the next big thing. Then, all along, it was really the same people doing the work. What this point means is that the focus should be, and should have been, on the people and the communication among them. The process and tools should be the minimum needed for any given situation on your exam. It's all about the people, the individuals, and the interactions over processes and tools. working software over comprehensive documentation. People get really excited when we talk about this. Documentation is so important. Yes, it is. But which is more important? Working software or comprehensive documentation? There's no value added to documentation. There's no value to the documentation if the software doesn't work. Agile projects need to deliver value. That's what's important. Value is about the purpose or the business need that the project aims to accomplish. So the goal of the project isn't to create documentation. Who reads it? How many times have you had to document a piece of software, and you know no one has ever read it since one Agile document is barely sufficient? Documentation is done just in time, and at the last responsible moment, documentation might also be done just because you have to. So some of you are when I teach this in person. People say, "Oh, well, at work, we have to do it because it's a requirement, an industry requirement, or a compliance issue." Hey, that's fine. That's just because of industry requirements or organisational requirements. So it's always the big question. So what level of documentation is really proper? Now, the philosophy of Agile is to always do the least amount of something and no longer be a regulated industry, okay? You're in a regulated industry, you're probablygoing to have to have much moredocumentation than an unregulated industry. Agile processes accommodate both. So how much documenting do you have to do? Well, it really depends on your industry. But the best answer is whatever is minimally sufficient for customer collaboration over contract negotiation. Agile is flexible. It's accommodating. It accepts and welcomes changes. Contracts are just the opposite, right? Contracts are rigid and uncooperative, and they don't like changes. Well, Agile contracts can work. You can have contracts for Agile. You just have to have consensus between the buyer and the seller that we're using Agile. So Agile contracts must accommodate change. So this means you have some type of contract change control system defined. Now, there's a difference between just being right and doing the right thing. Whenever we focus on contracts, we go back to the Pinball Guide and look at Chapter 12 about contracting and procurement. Every time we focus on contracts, everybody says, "Oh, we've got a contract." That is what we always adhere to. So it really creates a false sense of security that we think everybody is agreeing to what's being done because we have a signed contract. Both parties agree. Well, in reality, you just don't know what you don't know. Agile is really a better approach to the solution. Yes, we still need contracts, but they need to be flexible and have change control, as I mentioned, built in to accommodate Agile. Sure, there's going to be a sales effort that's required to convince the customer of a more flexible contract approach. So it's our responsibility as Agile project managers to explain that there are going to be many opportunities for change, but the customer is still in complete control. So we have to educate others about Agile. Following on with that idea about responding to change and following a plan is very important. Agile welcomes change. We've already seen this, right? You can change the scope. Predictive projects are just the opposite. They become very adverse to change. We want everything planned in advance. Now, in Agile projects, they have lots and lots of changes. Agile projects have a lot of certainty upfront. You don't know what you don't know. So these projects have these elaborate project plans with all the Gantt charts, and soon they fail all the time. We've seen this over and over. So why make all these complex plans and all these details that are tough to change or modify in the project when, a lot of times, they don't work? How are you making all of these plans for something you have no idea about? So Agile responds to that by replacing those project plans with release schedules. And we have charts that have been burned down or burned up to accommodate change so that we can still track progress. And really, in Agile, the tracking of the progress is more transparent than your typical predictive project plan. And we'll talk more about that coming up when we get into adaptive planning. Now, in the next lecture, we're going to dig a little bit deeper into the Agile Manifesto and what the twelve principles behind it are. So there are twelve guiding principles that support these four principles we just discussed. So these support the Agile manifesto. Now, again, for your PMI ACP exam, I want you to be familiar, but you do not need to memorise these twelve guiding principles. You want to be able to recognise them, which should help you make the right choice on your exam for the different questions you have. And so when your quiz comes up, you're going to see some of these principles, and I guarantee on your exam you're going to see the concepts behind these principles. So take some time and really dig in and become familiar with these, but don't fill the need that you have to memorise what we just talked about and what we'll talk about in the next lecture.

5. Building Your Agile Mindset: 12 Principles of Agile

In this lecture, we're going to examine the twelve principles of the Agile Manifesto. really looking at what's behind the Agile Manifesto. Principle One: Our highest priority is to satisfy the customers through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. So how do we go about doing that? Remember the backlog of products prioritised by the customer and by the product owner? So by delivering on those items first, we're delivering value early because it's what the customer values; it's their priorities, and we're doing that through iterations. So continuous delivery of valuable software Principle 2 is welcome. Changing requirements. Even late in development, agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage. In traditional project management, in waterfall project management, or in predictive project management, we're always very adverse to change, especially late in the project. That's when it's most expensive. In Agile, you can incorporate change at any time in the project. So even being late in the project is welcome. So this is part of that Agile mindset where we welcome change. Our goal is to deliver value to the customer for the customer's competitive advantage. Principle Three deliver working software frequently from acouple of weeks to a couple of monthswith a preference to the shorter time scale. So we're working on priorities, and then those go into a sprint or an iteration, and those usually last two to four weeks. Yes, they could last shorter or longer, but typically, it's two to four weeks. That's our preference for the shorter time square. But our goal is, within that iteration, to finish those priorities and deliver something at the end of that iteration that we can demo to the customer. And so we're showing that we havedone value over this last iteration. Principle Four business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project. So it's a little bit different than what we see in regular project management and predictive project management, where we have that kick-off meeting and then the team goes and they do the work, and then at some point the project manager brings it back to the business people, and you might have some scope validation in there throughout the lifecycle, but it's not a daily communication. Well an agile it is business people likethe product owner and your customers, that theywork with developers every day, that they communicatewith developers every day throughout the whole project. So again, communication is really important and agile. Principle Five: Build projects around motivated individuals, give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done. A lot of important things in this principle. First off, you want to build projects around motivated individuals. You don't want to be on a project where everybody hates it, nobody wants to be there, people are not happy, and that's not any fun. So we need motivated individuals. How do we find motivated individuals? The better question is: How do we motivate individuals? So find out what motivates the people on your team, and then you help them reach those goals. You help them be motivated, and then you give them the environment and the support they need. So it's their environment, so it's the project team that owns that room; they own that environment. They are able to freely experiment, work, and divide up the work as they see fit. And you support them as the agile project manager. That's servant leadership, the last point here. and trust them to get the job done. You are not a helicopter. You don't hover over the project team; you get out of the way, you give them support, and you communicate with them every day. But you get out of the way, and you let people do the work. So you trust them, the project team, to get the job done. Principle Sixth, the most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation. Face-to-face communication is critical for successful agile projects as well as the PMI ACP exam. Phone calls, text messages, emails, or a letter are not as close as face-to-face communication. So, being in the same room, in the same place, and being able to read body language and facial expressions, it's easy to follow up with questions and clarifications. So in a face-to-face conversation, know that for your exam, I guarantee you're going to see it. Principle Seven working software isthe primary measure of progress. If you spend all day with your team members developing code and they get to the end of the day and the code they've worked on doesn't work, it just won't compile and won't work. What do they do? Save it, work on it tomorrow, or just throw it away and start over tomorrow? Well, many developers subscribe to the mindset that your approach that you've taken all day is not working, so you throw it away and start over. The whole team measures progress by what's working, not by how many lines of code you've developed or how many tests you've written, but by how many tests you've passed. Is the software working? That's where the value is. So working software is the primary measure of progress. Principle Eight agile processes promote sustainable development. Sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely. We have to read through the lines or between the lines a little bit here. Sustainable development means that you don't overwork the team, that you don't say everyone needs to work a twelve-hour day for the next six months, forget it.People are going to get burned out and frustrated and unhappy, and they will not be motivated. Sustainable development is working a reasonable number of hours in order to work a reasonable number of hours indefinitely. So what this means is your team members are not burning out on developing code for the software; it's constant and steady, and they can handle it. So that's going to vary from organisation to organisation and project to project, but I guarantee you it's not 12 hours a day for six months. Principle Nine continuous attention to technicalexcellence and good design enhances agility. This means that the team creates a framework or model to work towards. So they have a method for developing, coding, annotating, and even checking in and testing, and they all adhere to that framework, model, and agreement of what constitutes technical excellence and good design, which increases agility across the entire project team because everyone is adhering to the same technical excellence and good design. Principle ten: simplicity The art of maximising the amount of work not done is essential. It sounds like a little proverb, doesn't it, that what you don't do is often more important? So the art of maximising the amount of work not done is to avoid scope creep and goldplating, and to not create things that are not within scope, even if they'd be quick and easy. No, we keep it simple and give the customer exactly what was requested. So it's not always what you do, but it's often what you resist doing. So you keep it out of the project. If it's not part of the project or part of the current iteration, you keep it simple. Now, simple does not mean easy. "Simple" means that you are delivering exactly what was requested and exactly what the requirements are. Nothing more, nothing less. Principle 11: The best architecture's requirements and designs emerge from self-organizing teams. So from your team's perspective, you are a servant leader. You don't make the decisions about the architecture, they do. and the requirements and designs come from the team. You are a facilitator, not command and control. This is a challenge for a lot of project managers who come from a waterfall environment or a predictive environment where the whole plan is known up front. It's different. In Agile, the team is at the center, not the project manager. Principle Twelve: At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective than its peers and adjusts its behaviours accordingly. Now, regular intervals, really we're talking about atthe end of an iteration that there's anopportunity to reflect on what's been done. So we look at what's working, what isn't working, and how we can improve that for the next iteration. So we always look back and apply lessons learned, but we do it throughout the project. We don't wait until the very end when the team disbands and they go about their own business and back to their lives. We do it throughout the project. Finally, just to stay in touch Individuals and interactions were prioritised over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, and responding to change over following a plan. Spend some time looking at those twelve principles and these four values of the Agile Manifesto before you move on to the course, because the remainder of the course is going to be based on all of those principles and these four values you're going to see. The exam domains will constantly come back and refer to this as we begin to look at the tools and the techniques and the tasks that you will do as an Agile Project Manager.

Go to testing centre with ease on our mind when you use PMI PMI-ACP vce exam dumps, practice test questions and answers. PMI PMI-ACP PMI Agile Certified Practitioner certification practice test questions and answers, study guide, exam dumps and video training course in vce format to help you study with ease. Prepare with confidence and study using PMI PMI-ACP exam dumps & practice test questions and answers vce from ExamCollection.

Read More


Comments
* The most recent comment are at the top
  • pescador
  • Kazakhstan
  • Feb 10, 2020

@duncan, i am interested

  • Feb 10, 2020
  • kikwete
  • Botswana
  • Feb 01, 2020

I need PMI ACP practice tests. where can I get unlimited access to them?

  • Feb 01, 2020
  • hasan
  • Egypt
  • Jan 30, 2020

@ sanchez, some of the pmi acp practice questions and answers are not valid but at least the bigger percentage is helpful.

  • Jan 30, 2020
  • duncan
  • United States
  • Jan 25, 2020

I have actual questions and answers for pmi acp exam which I want to give out, anybody interested?

  • Jan 25, 2020
  • cecily
  • Canada
  • Jan 15, 2020

Wow! Despite pmi acp exam being difficult, I managed to perform excellently. pmi acp brain dumps really helped me. I am grateful guys!

  • Jan 15, 2020
  • peter
  • United States
  • Jan 08, 2020

anyone with pmi acp questions to provide me a copy of them?

  • Jan 08, 2020
  • atsu
  • India
  • Jan 08, 2020

@ sanchez , premium file pmi acp is one hundred percent valid. It helped me to attain the passing score. thank you guys.

  • Jan 08, 2020
  • sanchez
  • Cambodia
  • Jan 01, 2020

@naziz, are the pim acp premium files valid? Do the questions reflect those in the main exam?

  • Jan 01, 2020
  • Mesut
  • Canada
  • Dec 27, 2019

anyone in need of pmi acp practice exam?? It is actually helpful since it comprises questions very similar to those tested in the actual exam. It tests to what extent are you prepared for exam and determine the areas you need to study further. It truly helped me to prepare for my pmi acp cert exam.

  • Dec 27, 2019
  • naziz
  • United States
  • Dec 18, 2019

i took the PMI ACP exam and excelled. it was a surprise for managing scored 72 percent. thanks to pmi acp practice questions, they were really awesome!

  • Dec 18, 2019
  • Catherina
  • Ireland
  • Dec 15, 2019

pmi acp exam dumps comprises all what is required to excel in pmi acp exam. it’s now the or never… download your copies to aid your revision for the exam and promise you will rejoice after the results are out.

  • Dec 15, 2019
  • pellegrini
  • Spain
  • Dec 07, 2019

there are plenty of questions and answers comprised in PMI ACP premium VCE file. I have tried them and I acknowledge they are really informative. if in need of them, you can download them instantly from ExamCollection website.

  • Dec 07, 2019
  • falcao
  • Belgium
  • Dec 01, 2019

pmi acp sample exam questions are helpful. they cover all the exam objectives. For me it was easy to pass the cert exam.recommend!

  • Dec 01, 2019
  • lela
  • France
  • Nov 25, 2019

am very excited having managed to hit the passing score and becoming PMI Agile certified practitioner. for sure PMI ACP dumps leads you towards success.

  • Nov 25, 2019
  • pedro
  • Brazil
  • Nov 22, 2019

PMI ACP exam questions should not be ignored when studying for the real exam. they actually idealize a candidate on the questions he or she should expect. actually, these questions may be tested repeatedly and thus an individual who has come across them will have an added advantage.

  • Nov 22, 2019
  • cahill
  • Ecuador
  • Nov 14, 2019

I passed ACP exam a few days ago. pmi acp practice test provided me with tremendous experience regarding the cert exam thus it made things easier for me!

  • Nov 14, 2019

Add Comment

Feel Free to Post Your Comments About EamCollection VCE Files which Include PMI PMI-ACP Exam Dumps, Practice Test Questions & Answers.

Purchase Individually

PMI-ACP Premium File

Premium File
PMI-ACP Premium File
204 Q&A
$76.99$69.99

PMI-ACP Training Video Course

Training Course
PMI-ACP Training Video Course
68 Lectures
$27.49$24.99

PMI-ACP Study Guide

Study Guide
PMI-ACP Study Guide
587 PDF Pages
$27.49$24.99

Top PMI Certifications

Top PMI Certification Exams

Site Search:

 

VISA, MasterCard, AmericanExpress, UnionPay

SPECIAL OFFER: GET 10% OFF

ExamCollection Premium

ExamCollection Premium Files

Pass your Exam with ExamCollection's PREMIUM files!

  • ExamCollection Certified Safe Files
  • Guaranteed to have ACTUAL Exam Questions
  • Up-to-Date Exam Study Material - Verified by Experts
  • Instant Downloads
Enter Your Email Address to Receive Your 10% Off Discount Code
A Confirmation Link will be sent to this email address to verify your login
We value your privacy. We will not rent or sell your email address

SPECIAL OFFER: GET 10% OFF

Use Discount Code:

MIN10OFF

A confirmation link was sent to your e-mail.
Please check your mailbox for a message from support@examcollection.com and follow the directions.

Next

Download Free Demo of VCE Exam Simulator

Experience Avanset VCE Exam Simulator for yourself.

Simply submit your e-mail address below to get started with our interactive software demo of your free trial.

Free Demo Limits: In the demo version you will be able to access only first 5 questions from exam.